2021 Theory Winter School

The National High Magnetic Field lab will hold its 9th Theory Winter School virtually via Zoom, on 11-15 January, 2021.

  • Overview

    This year's School will focus on "Modern aspects of quantum condensed matter", a subject inspired by recent developments in condensed matter physics. These developments shed new light on open questions of quantum criticality, unconventional superconductivity, and new types of topological phases of matter. The tentative topics of the school include novel phases in twisted bilayer graphene and other moire systems, recent developments in unconventional superconductivity, topology of electronic states, and quantum magnetism.

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    Lecturers

    Agterberg, Daniel University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
    Balents, Leon KITP and UC Santa Barbara
    Bernevig, Andrei B. Princeton University
    Cano, Jennifer Stony Brook University/Flatiron Institute
    MacDonald, Allan UT Austin
    Metlitski, Max MIT
    Regnault, Nicolas Ecole Normale, Paris
    Savary, Lucile CNRS Lyon
    Vishwanath, Ashvin Harvard University
     

    Organizers/Contacts

    Organizers: Contacts:
    Bradlyn, Barry
    University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign
    This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
    850-644-3665
    Chubukov, Andrey
    University of Minnesota
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    850-644-3203
    Vafek, Oskar
    National MagLab/FSU
     
     
  • Agenda

    Agenda for 2021 Theory Winter School

    Monday, January 11, 2021

    10:00-11:00 a.m. Ashvin Vishwanath (Harvard University) - Lecture 1: Flavor magnetism and superconductivity in magic angle graphene(s).
    11:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Allan MacDonald (UT Austin) - Lecture 1: Broken Flavor Symmetries in Twisted Bilayer Graphene
    2:00-3:00 p.m. Jenifer Cano (Stony Brook University/Flatiron Institute) - Lecture 1: Introduction to Topological Insulators
    3:15-4:15 p.m. Nicolas Regnault (Ecole Normale, Paris) - Lecture 1: Twisted bilayer graphene and Coulomb interaction: baking insulator states in six steps
    4:30-5:30 p.m. Zoom Poster Session

    Tuesday, January 12, 2021

    10:00-11:00 a.m. Ashvin Vishwanath (Harvard University) - Lecture 2: A topological Landau theory of entwined orders in magic angle graphene(s)
    11:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Allan MacDonald (UT Austin) - Lecture 2: Broken Flavor Symmetries in Twisted Bilayer Graphene
    2:00-3:00 p.m. Jenifer Cano (Stony Brook University/Flatiron Institute) - Lecture 2: Topological Quantum Chemistry
    3:15-4:15 p.m. Nicolas Regnault (Ecole Normale, Paris) - Lecture 2: Twisted bilayer graphene and Coulomb interaction: baking insulator states in six steps
    4:30-5:30 p.m. Zoom Poster Session

    Wednesday, January 13, 2021

    10:00-11:00 a.m. Lucile Savary (CNRS Lyon) - Lecture 1: Quantum Spin Liquids
    11:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Daniel Agterberg (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee) - Lecture 1: Nodal excitations in superconductors: insight from symmetry and topology
    2:00-3:00 p.m. Max Metlitski (MIT) - Lecture 1: Aspects of symmetry protected topological phases

    Thursday, January 14, 2021

    10:00-11:00 a.m. Daniel Agterberg (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee) - Lecture 2: Nodal excitations in superconductors: insight from symmetry and topology
    11:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Andrei Bernevig (Princeton University) - Lecture 1: Flat Bands in Moire Lattices and Beyond
    2:00-3:00 p.m. Leon Balents (KITP and UC Santa Barbara) - Lecture 1: Magnetism and Moiré
    3:15-4:15 p.m. Max Metlitski (MIT) - Lecture 2: Aspects of symmetry protected topological phases
    4:30 - 5:30 p.m. Zoom Poster Session

    Friday, January 15, 2021

    10:00-11:00 a.m. Lucile Savary (CNRS Lyon) - Lecture 2: Quantum Spin Liquids
    11:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Andrei Bernevig (Princeton University) - Lecture 2: Flat Bands in Moire Lattices and Beyond
    2:00-4:15 p.m. Leon Balents (KITP and UC Santa Barbara) - Lecture 2: Magnetism and Moiré
     
  • Talks

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Last modified on 25 May 2021