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The MagLab is funded by the National Science Foundation and the State of Florida.

Facilities & Capabilities

MagLab Engineers performing maintenance

The Magnet Science & Technology division has  facilities for components testing, mechanical & physical properties testing and microanlysis lab. Our materials scientists use the latest micro-characterization techniques to better understand and improve the micro/nano-structure of materials.

Dual Beam Focused Ion Beam/Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope

Bob Goddard uses the Zeiss 1540 EsB crossbeam scanning electron microscope

Bob Goddard uses the Zeiss 1540 EsB crossbeam scanning electron microscope

The Zeiss 1540EsB is a multi-technique dual beam (electron and Ga ion) field emission Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) with a spatial resolution for imaging of 1 nanometer (0.8 nm STEM).

This multifunctional tool has many advanced features:

  • FIB: The low-energy capable Focused Ion Beam (FIB) column, allows for live-imaging of samples at high magnification (both microscopes have 1 nm resolution) while simultaneously machining with 5 nanometer precision using a stream of Ga ions.
  • EsB: Low voltage in-lens backscattered electron imaging (also in-lens secondary electron imaging).
  • GIS: A gas injection system makes it possible to deposit material for protective coatings and contacts as well as to modify etch rates and is an essential tool for the automated preparation of transmission electron microscope specimens.
  • OIM: High resolution crystallographic orientation imaging (high speed Hikari camera).
  • EDS: Fast chemical mapping (EDAX Apollo XPP SDD detector with a tested <126 eV energy resolution measured at MnK and 10 kcps and 20 kV, capable of 850,000 cps). Both the OIM and EDS systems are integrated allowing simultaneous mapping of the same area.
  • NPGS: Electron lithography (Nabity Nanopattern Generating System) and FIB patterning.
  • Nanoprobe: An Omniprobe Autoprobe (model 200.2) provides precise sample extraction and manipulation as well as mechanical (NanoMech) and electrical testing (AETA).

This system is ideally suited to providing electron-transparent sample for imaging in the MagLab’s spherical aberration probe corrected JEM-ARM200cF sub-Å resolution scanning transmission analytical electron microscope.


Information on how this instrument is being used is available on our scheduling page (accessible only to MagLab and FSU staff) and by contacting Yan Xin.


JEM-2011 Transmission/Scanning Electron Microscope

JEM-2011 Transmission/Scanning Electron Microscope

JEM-2011 Transmission/Scanning Electron Microscope

This 200 kV transmission electron microscope is fitted with a LaB6 filament and has a lattice and point resolutions of 0.14 nm and 0.23 nm, respectively.

Its magnification ranges from 100x to 1500,000x, and it is equipped with a scanning unit, PGT Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) detector, a side entry AMT CCD camera.

In addition to high resolution imaging capability, the equipment allows localized compositional and structural analyses of materials.

Typical analyses include:

  • Conventional diffraction contrast imaging
  • Electron diffraction
  • High resolution transmission electron imaging
  • Nano scale compositional analysis with 10 nm spatial resolution

Information on how this instrument is being used is available on our scheduling page (accessible only to MagLab and FSU staff) and by contacting Yan Xin.


JEM-ARM200cF Transmission Electron Microscope

Scientist Yan Xin works on the JEM-ARM200cF

Scientist Yan Xin works on the JEM-ARM200cF

This state-of-the-art s/TEM, incorporating a probe spherical aberration corrector for electron optic system and the maximum level of electrical and mechanical stability, has achieved a scanning transmission image (STEM-HAADF) resolution of 0.078 nm, the highest in the world among the commercial transmission electron microscopes.

The electron probe, after its aberrations are corrected, features a current density level higher by an order of magnitude than conventional transmission electron microscopes. With this probe finely focused, the ARM200F is capable of atomic level analysis. It operates at 200kV, 120kV and 80kV.

This microscope is equipped with the following:

  • Cold Field Emission Gun
  • Upgraded GIF QuantumSE™ imaging filter with 1 µs Electrostatic fast shutter
  • DUAL EELS
  • Gatan BF/DF, HAADF STEM detectors
  • JEOL BF/HAADF STEM detectors
  • Gatan Orius Model 830 SC200 CCD camera 2kx2k camera
  • Gatan UltraScan™ 4000 4kx4k CCD camera
  • EDAX Si(Li) 30mm2 energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy detector
  • JEOL backscattered SE detector

Specifications at 200kV

  • TEM lattice resolution 0.72 Å
  • TEM point to point resolution 1.9 Å
  • TEM information limit 1.0 Å
  • STEM HAADF resolution 0.78 Å
  • STEM BF resolution 1.1 Å
  • Ronchigram flat region 46.16 mrad
  • Energy resolution at full emission (15.0 µA) 0.46 eV
  • Energy resolution at reduced emission (1.0 µA) 0.34 eV

Available Techniques

  • High Resolution TEM imaging
  • Atomic Resolution HAADF and ABF STEM Imaging
  • Energy Filtered TEM
  • EFTEM Spectrum Imaging
  • STEM Spectrum Imaging
  • Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy
  • EDS with 0.13 nm spatial resolution
  • Electron Diffraction

For more information contact Yan Xin or visit the Transmission Electron Microscopy page on the Florida State University’s Office of Research website.


Leica Optical Microscope

Leica optical microscope

Leica optical microscope

This optical microscope (REICHERT MEF4M Metallograph with Digital Imaging Acquisition and Analysis) is an inverted wide field Metallograph with a high degree of automation.

It is equipped with the IMIX (Integrated Microanalyzer for Images and X-rays) software for image analysis and offers versatility in the following techniques:

  • Bright Field Imaging
  • Differential Interference Contrast
  • Digital Image Acquisition
  • Field Imaging
  • Interferometry
  • Polarized Light and Polarization Contrast

For more information, please contact Yan Xin.


Sample Preparation Laboratory

In recognition of the fact that sample preparation is important in materials characterization, our laboratory has extensive facilities for metallographic, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) sample preparation.

The various categories include a dark room for developing negatives, as well as:

Metallographic and SEM Sample Preparation Facility

  • Struers’ Primopress, Uniforce and Buehler’s Simplimet for sample mounting
  • Struers’ RotoPol-21 and RotoPol-2 for grinding
  • Struers' Vibratory polisher, Abrapol-2 and Buehler’s Vibromet2 for polishing
  • Struers’ Accutom-5 for cutting

TEM Sample Preparation Facility

  • Low speed saw
  • Struers TenuPol-5 jet polishing system
  • Gatan dimpler
  • Gatan Precision Ion Polishing System (PIPS)
  • Gatan Solarus™ (Model 950) Advanced Plasma Cleaning System
  • Fischione ion mill

Thermo Fisher Scientific/FEI Dual Beam Focused Ion Beam/Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope/

The FIB microscope will allow materials science researchers to slice through minuscule material samples and collect images of their structures.

The FIB microscope will allow materials science researchers to slice through minuscule material samples and collect images of their structures.

The FEI Helios G4 UC is a multi-technique dual beam (electron and Ga ion) Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM) with a spatial resolution for imaging of 0.7 nanometer.

The FEI Helios G4 UC is a dual field emission electron and Ga ion beam Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) with a spatial resolution for imaging of 0.7 nanometer. This interdisciplinary tool has many additional capabilities:

  • FIB: The low-energy capable Focused Ion Beam (FIB) column, allows for live-imaging of samples at high magnification (both microscopes have 1 nm resolution) while simultaneously machining or deposition with critical dimensions of less than 10nm using a stream of Ga ions. AutoSlice software allows for highest quality, fully automated acquisition of multimodal 3D datasets.
  • GIS: The gas injection system (GIS) makes it possible to deposit material for protective coatings and contacts as well as to modify etch rates and is an essential tool for the automated preparation of transmission electron microscope specimens.
  • EBSD: High resolution crystallographic orientation imaging by electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD).
  • EDS: Fast chemical identification and mapping by Energy Dispresive Spectroscopy (EDS).
  • NPGS: Electron lithography (Nabity Nanopattern Generating System) and FIB patterning.
  • Nanoprobe: Easylift FEI nanomanipulator provides precise sample extraction and manipulation.
  • STEM: Two-segment solid-state scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) detector for high-resolution bright and dark field imaging of FIB-prepared cross sections and critical dimension measurements. The STEM detector is designed to hold up to eight FIB-prepared grids placed on copper-grid supported carbon film. It can act as a pre-TEM tool to eliminate the unnecessary bulk of samples that can be analyzed for micro or nano defects, allowing the nano and atomic levels of observation in the TEM to be more efficiently spent.

This system is ideally suited to providing electron-transparent sample for imaging in the MagLab’s spherical aberration probe corrected JEM-ARM200cF sub-Å resolution scanning transmission analytical electron microscope.

Scanning Electron Microscopes

Scheduling

Scheduling is permitted up to a month in advance. Cancellations or changes are allowed up to 24 hours prior to the scheduled session.

Normal Working Hours (8am to 5pm)

  • Session block duration: no more than 4 hours and no less than one hour.
  • No more than two (2) session blocks within a calendar week.
  • No scheduling more than four (4) session blocks during normal working hours in advance.

Non-Normal Working Hours (After hours and on weekends)

  • Session blocks may be basically unlimited.

Billing

Scheduling reserves the microscope and is billable time. If a reserver does not show up within 30 minutes of the scheduled start time, the session may be given to another user. If another user, after a waiting period (30 minutes), takes the remainder of the reserved time, the original scheduler will be billed for time until the other user starts. The user that’s takes over the time, after the wait period, will be billed for usage when they start.

In the event that the entire session is able to be used by another user the time will not be billed to the original scheduler. All such assignment’s of time must be approved by microanalysis manager (contact listed below).

All use will be billed to the next half hour.

Training

Training for basic SEM self-operation will be given as-needed in groups of five at no cost. Please direct requests to the contact below. Prior to training the form Authorization Agreement for Use of Microanalysis Laboratory must be filled out. (The form will be transmitted after request.) The training session will consist of the general operation to include loading of samples, software navigation, obtaining a quality image, and proper condition for leaving the instrument when finished. After training, a two hour billable qualification session will be requested by the user to demonstrate proficiency of operation. Upon successful completion the user will be issued a logon to the SEM software and the SEM scheduling software.

Training for EBSD, EDS, FIB, e-beam lithography, FIB 3-D tomography, TEM sample preparation by FIB, or other special procedures will be scheduled as-needed. This training will be billable time and may require a separate qualification from the general SEM operation and could be demonstrated in the same session as the training according to the instructor.


Information on how this instrument is being used is available on our scheduling page and by contacting Yan Xin.


Components Testing

Components Testing Lab

Components Testing Lab

Cell 16 is a laboratory specifically dedicated to testing magnet components and large conductors. It features superconducting magnets, high current and voltage power and direct access to the lab’s helium liquefier.


Mechanical and Physical Properties Laboratory

Research Associate Bob Walsh examines the fracture surface of a tensile specimen on an inspection microscope in the Mechanical and Physical Properties Lab.

Research Associate Bob Walsh examines the fracture surface of a tensile specimen on an inspection microscope in the Mechanical and Physical Properties Lab.

Unique test equipment and methods are used by scientists to evaluate the performance of materials in extreme environments.

We also provide testing and analysis services to industry, universities and government agencies that require our experience and distinctive capabilities.

Equipment

Equipment for testing mechanical properties includes:

  • 100 kN (22 kip) MTS, w/cryostat
  • 250 kN (55 kip) MTS, w/cryostat
  • 250 kN (55 kip) MTS
  • 500 kN (110 kip) MTS, w/cryogenic capabilities
  • 50 kN (11 kip) Instron Screw machine (Elevated Temp Chamber)
  • 5 kN (1 kip) Instron Screw Machine
  • 250 N (50 lb) MTS Tytron Servo-electric
  • 22 kN (6 kip) High Cycle Fatigue (Electric Motor w/Cam/Lever)
  • 400 N-m (300 ft-lb) Charpy Impact
  • Rockwell Hardness Tester
  • Micro-hardness tester

Equipment for testing physical properties includes:

  • Ic vs B Probe (ITER Barrels and Hairpin)
  • Jc vs B and Strain Rig (100 mm long sample, 2.5 kN / 2kA / 20 T)
  • PPMS, Quantum Design (9T, Temp. Range 1.9 K - 400 K)
  • Thermal Expansion Dilatometer, Anter (Temp. Range 4 K - 1273 K)
  • Ultrasonic Elastic Modulus (295 K)
  • Resistance Measurement Test Stand (RRR)

CICC Magnet Shop

The cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) magnet shop handles all of the MagLab’s CICC building and fabrication needs. The group undertakes a wide range of projects and tasks, from building coils that weigh 6 tons to welding tubes as small as 1/8-inch in diameter. The group’s main job is building large-scale superconducting magnets, a process that includes winding, heat treatment, vacuum-pressure impregnation (VPI) and final assembly.

During the winding process, engineers manipulate rectangular CICC that is cleaned and wrapped by machines, then wound into a cylinder to shape a coil. The coil is then placed into a furnace and reacted at 700 degrees Celsius. This month-long process transforms the coil into a superconducting magnet. Once reacted, the coil is placed in a vacuum chamber where the windings are filled with a special epoxy developed at the lab. This VPI process strengthens the coil, preparing it for the stresses it will undergo during operation. The final assembly includes tasks such as electric Paschen testing, induction welding and brazing, critical lifting, and helium leak testing. Many other detailed operations occur during the major processes, including milling and machining, tig and mig welding, cryogen testing and chemical etching.

In addition, the shop does jobs for other groups in the lab, including vacuum tight welding, helium leak tests, and general fabrication for magnet users.

For more information contact Todd Adkins.


Resistive Magnet Shop

This group builds all the resistive coils for new magnet installations as well as replacement coils for existing systems in the lab’s DC Field Facility. The group assembles an average 10 coils a year; in its first two decades, its total output has been some 240 coils.

The group’s recent projects include the lab’s 25 tesla split magnet — as of 2014 still the most complicated resistive magnet ever built — and the conical bore resistive insert for series connected hybrid magnet built for the Helmholz Centre Berlin. Featuring patented, world-leading conical bore technology, the insert was successfully tested to 13 tesla in June 2014. The shop is currently charged with the 4-coil resistive insert for the MagLab’s 36 tesla series connected hybrid, a system that will feature world-record field homogeneity thanks to the use of sophisticated axial current grading.

Responsibilities of the shop’s experienced staff include:

  • Inspecting and processing thousands of individual parts manufactured by dozens of vendors (for each individual coil)
  • fabricating select parts
  • stacking individual coils
  • assembling coils, busing and housing components comprising the complete magnet system

For more information contact Jack Toth.


HTS Winding Shop

In this space we build high-temperature superconductor (HTS) magnets. The room is set up with a programmable winder for both layer- wound and pancake-style windings. Joints, terminals etc. are also created here using specialized hardware, and all components are then assembled into complete systems that are ready for use. We focus on REBCO Coated Conductors to build coils for high-field magnets operating a low temperatures, starting with the 32 T all-superconducting magnet.

For more information contact Lee Marks.


Machine Shop

The main machine shop covers 5,000 square feet and has a wide array of manufacturing equipment. Along with standard tool room machinery, the shop includes several 4-axis CNC mills, a CNC lathe, and a 6-axis wire EDM machine. Programming of the CNC machinery is aided by direct access to the MS&T design database. Manufactured parts vary in size from less than 1mm to the 1600mm X 800mm(X,Y) travel of the large NC mill. The six machinists have specialized skills in prototyping, fabricating scientific instrumentation and mechanical design.

For more information contact Edward Rubes.


Electro-Mechanical Testing

For more information on this capability please contact Bob Walsh.


Engineering Analysis

The Engineering Analysis group consists of a team of physicists and engineers who support magnet and system design through high level analyses. Design problems are often solved through numerical techniques which includes a variety of software that have been developed both in-house and commercially. Some of the in-house codes have been specifically written to address the concerns of high-field superconducting and resistive coils and include:

  • magnetic fields from solenoids with uniform or 1/r current distribution
  • coil stress analysis with a generalized plane strain assumption
  • eddy current analysis
  • superconducting coil optimization
  • magnetic field uniformity and inductance

The finite element method is often employed using ANSYS for coupled electromagnetic-thermal-structural models or Vector Fields for 3-D non-linear electromagnetic analyses. Thermo-hydraulic analysis of coils with cable-in-conduit conductors are performed using the customizable GANDALF software. If applicable, stringent design criteria are applied in the design of structures. These may include the ASME Boiler & Pressure Vessel Code, ASME Plumbing B31, ASME Below the Hook Lifting Devices, or fusion magnet structural design criteria.

For more information contact Iain Dixon.


Mechanical Engineering & Design

The lab’s Engineering Design team tackles a wide variety of design applications and challenges. The team designs thousands of parts for the lab’s large magnet systems, such as the 45 tesla hybrid and the 900 MHz ultra wide bore magnets, as well as for systems under development. Each magnet project has unique requirements, and parts — some weighing a few grams, some more than a ton — must be designed to withstand considerable forces over the course of many years. The group is responsible for parts for resistive, superconducting and hybrid magnet systems, ranging from a simple test apparatus to complex hybrid superconducting systems.

Team engineers bring decades of experience to the job and skills that include CAD, Autodesk Inventor/Vault and ANSYS Workbench as well as analysis software.

For more information contact Scott Bole.


Project Management

The Magnet Science & Technology group typically manages several highly complicated magnet-building projects concurrently, and the group’s expertise in complex project management meets these demands. Using a methodology dubbed Project Management Improvement Program (PMIP), group administrators manage critical project parameters including cost, personnel resourcing and milestone schedules. The group’s scientists and engineers are continuously designing and building things that have never been done before — a challenge when predicting costs and schedules. Our structured approach to project management improves our ability to assess and manage risk and, in turn, to meet cost and schedule goals while continuing to break world records.

For more information contact Sheryl Zavion.


Last modified on 31 December 2022