Time for MagLab Open House!

Come celebrate science past, present and future at the MagLab’s 25th annual Open House event on Sat, Feb 22nd! It’s free and fun for all ages across space and time!

Probe tip

A Conversation with Jeremy Owens

Thanks to funding from a prestigious fellowship, this MagLab geochemist will learn more about ancient climate change, and perhaps help us understand modern climate change in the process.

Jeremy Owens

Science Friends, Through Thick and Thin

When women in STEM encounter hurdles in their careers, having fellow female scientists as friends can make all the difference.

Left to right: Amy McKenna, Huan Chen, Komalavalli Thirunavukkuarasu and Laura Greene.

MLK Distinguished Service Award Winner

Congratulations to MagLab researcher Huan Chen who was awarded for her work to advance the diversity and research mission of the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory and FSU.

Huan Chen awarded MLK Distinguished Service Award

Picture Paints a Thousand Molecules

Scientists have captured molecular maps of animal tissue with unprecedented detail by coupling a powerful technique with a world-record magnet.

This image of a rat brain, generated with the MagLab's 21-tesla ICR mass spectrometer, reveals the distribution of three specific lipids.

Electron Spin Resonance

New research shows how transition metal can retain quantum information, important work on the path to next-generation quantum technologies.

(a) The phase diagram of FeSe0.89S0.11 which shows two distinct superconducting domes that are separated by a change of the Fermi surface at intermediate pressures (i.e. Lifshitz transition). (c) This is confirmed by a shift in the quantum oscillation frequencies with higher pressures. The largest oscillations shown (blue) are for a temperature of 0.3K.

Nemesis to Superconductivity

Nematic phase with elements of both liquids and solids weakens superconductivity in iron-based superconductor.

(a) The phase diagram of FeSe0.89S0.11 which shows two distinct superconducting domes that are separated by a change of the Fermi surface at intermediate pressures (i.e. Lifshitz transition). (c) This is confirmed by a shift in the quantum oscillation frequencies with higher pressures. The largest oscillations shown (blue) are for a temperature of 0.3K.

New Research Offers Path to Understanding Sleep

High-field magnets imaged a possible path for metabolic waste and suggests that brain waste removal may be one reason why we sleep.

Actual MRI cross-section of the mouse brain, showing injection site

Research Initiatives

Research Initiatives - Materials

MATERIALS

Scientists use our magnets to explore semiconductors, superconductors, newly-grown crystals, buckyballs and materials from the natural world — research that reveals the secret workings of materials and empowers us to develop new technologies.

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Research Initiatives - Energy

ENERGY

Scientists here are working to optimize petroleum refining, advance potential bio-fuels such as pine needles and algae, and fundamentally change the way we store and deliver energy by developing better batteries.

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Research Initiatives - Life

LIFE

With the world’s strongest MRI magnet, scientists here study everything from living animals to individual cells, from proteins to disease-fighting molecules found in plants and animals — work that could improve treatment of AIDS, cancer, Alzheimer’s and other diseases.

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Latest Science Highlights


  • Nuclear Spin Patterning Controls Electron Spin Coherence
    31 January 2020
    Nuclear Spin Patterning Controls Electron Spin Coherence

    Electron spin resonance work shows how transition metal can retain quantum information, important work on the path to next-generation quantum technologies.

  • Brain Waste Pathway Found
    23 January 2020
    Brain Waste Pathway Found

    Little is known about the path of metabolic waste clearance from the brain. Here, high-field magnetic resonance images a possible pathway for metabolic waste removal from the brain and suggests that waste clearance may be one reason why we sleep.

  • Nematic Phase Weakens Superconductivity
    23 January 2020
    Nematic Phase Weakens Superconductivity

    A nematic phase is where the molecular/atomic dynamics show elements of both liquids and solids, like in liquid crystal displays on digital watches or calculators. Using high magnetic fields and high pressure, researchers probed the electronic states of an iron-based superconductor and found that its nematic state weakened superconductivity.

See all Science Highlights

Featured Publications


Nuclear Spin Patterning Controls Electron Spin Coherence , C.E. Jackson, et al., , Chem. Sci., 10 (36), 8447-8454 (2019) See Science Highlight or Read online 

Influence of a nematic phase on high-temperature superconductivity , P. Reiss, et al., Nature Physics, 28, Oct (2019) See Science Highlight or Read online 

High Magnetic Field MRI Evidences Pathwaysfor Metabolic Brain Waste Clearance, K. N. Magdoom, et al., Nature Scientific Reports, 9, 11480 (2019) See Science Highlight or Read online 

Liquid State Dynamic Nuclear Polarization at High Magnetic Field, T. Dubroca, et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys, 21 21200-21204 (2019) See Science Highlight or Read online 

Hafnium greatly improves Nb3Sn superconductor for high field magnets, S. Balachandran, et al., Superconductor Science and Technology,32, 044006 (2019) See Science Highlight or Read online 

Why does magnetic switching occur at such high magnetic fields in Sr3NiIrO6? , K.R. O'Neal, et al., njp Quantum Materials,4, 48 (2019) See Science Highlight or Read online 

Identification of abnormal hemoglobin from human blood , L. He, et al., Clinical Chemistry,65 (8), 986-994 (2019) See Science Highlight or Read online 

Topological structural defects in the spin liquid candidate TbInO3 , J.W. Kim, et al., Phys. Rev. X, 9, 031005 (2019) See Science Highlight or Read online 

Luttinger liquid behavior of helium-three in nanotubes , J. Adams, et al., J. Low Temp. Phys., 196 (1-2), 308-313 (2019) See Science Highlight or Read online 

Ultra-high magnetic fields provide new insights into bone-like materials, C. Bonhomme, et al., Chemical Communications, 54 (69), 9591-9594 (2018) See Science Highlight or Read online