Spring 2020

About the Earth Issue Cover

About the Earth Issue Cover

Hidden messages abound in the cover of our latest issue.

Scientists Get Down to Earth on Climate Change

Scientists Get Down to Earth on Climate Change

Researchers talk about what they're doing outside the lab to protect our planet and how their training as scientists informs those efforts.

Poison in the Pavement

Poison in the Pavement

A deeper understanding of petroleum molecules is shedding a harsh light on how some of them behave in our environment.

There's a First Time for Sciencing

There's a First Time for Sciencing

In the first year of this new decade, we asked researchers about their most memorable first-time experiences as scientists. Here’s what they had to say.

Tushar Bhomwick celebrates his "Phew" moment.

The "Phew" Moment

A team tackling some gnarly physics using tricky techniques rounds a critical corner. Joy ensues. Then, back to work.

Recycled neodymium iron boride magnet blocks from Urban Mining Company.

Studying Magnets in Magnets

Researchers put little permanent magnets into large electromagnets to find out how to make them better.

Physicist Nick Butch discovered a Lazarus-like form of superconductivity in uranium ditelluride.

A Superconductor Full of Surprises

High magnetic fields usually kill superconductivity. But in this material, it brought it back to life.

MRI images of the perivascular networks in the brains of four rats. Vessels with perivascular spaces (PVS) that appear to be common in different rats are highlighted using colored arrows.

Mapping the Brain's Weird Web of Waste

Using advanced MRI, a mechanical engineer tackles the question: "Why do you have these big fluid spaces in your head?"

Artsy-Chartsy

Artsy-Chartsy

With a little imagination and editing, discoveries found at national magnet labs could fit as well on a museum wall as they do on the pages of scientific journals.

A “kicker” magnet is tested for use in the high-luminosity upgrade to CERN’s Large Hadron Collider.

Joining Forces to Split Particles

The world's largest particle collider is getting even larger, and magnet labs are helping lay the foundation.

Friends Indeed

Friends Indeed

An understanding ear, a shot of confidence and emergency babysitting services: For underrepresented women in science, that's what friends are for.

From Material to Superconducting Magnet

From Material to Superconducting Magnet

Ernesto Bosque is helping to develop a promising superconductor into tomorrow's powerful electromagnets.

Representation of perfluorooctanesulfonate (or PFOS), one kind of PFAS molecule commonly used in fire-fighting foams. PFAS are known as “forever chemicals” due to the very strong bonds behind fluorine atoms (depicted in blue) and carbon atoms (depicted in white).

'Til Death Do They Part?

Some manmade chemicals feature bonds so strong they could last forever. And that's a life-threatening problem.