Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Resonance Imaging / Spectroscopy

900 MHz 105 mm Bore NMR Magnet

Users Michael Harrington (Huntington Medical Research Institute). left, and Eduard Chekmenev (Vanderbilt University), right , work with staff scientist Victor Schepkin on the 900.

900 MHz 105 mm Bore NMR Magnet

4.7 Tesla 33 cm MRI/S System

Located at AMRIS at our University of Florida campus in Gainesville.

4.7 Tesla 33 cm MRI/S System

Technology Development

We are world leaders in designing and building probes and other NMR-MRI/S instrumentation.

An NMR probe.

High-resolution Imaging

Viewing images obtained with the 4.7 tesla MRI scanner at the Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy Facility at the University of Florida in Gainesville.

Viewing images obtained with the 4.7 tesla MRI scanner at the Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy Facility  at the University of Florida in Gainesville.

NMR - MRI/S techniques and instruments are available at two different MagLab facilities in Florida: The NMR-MRI/S Facility at MagLab headquarters near Florida State University in Tallahassee and the Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy Facility (AMRIS) housed within the McKnight Brain Institute at the University of Florida in Gainesville.

Working in tandem, these facilities combine unique magnets, equipment and expert scientific support with advanced capabilities for technique and instrumentation development. About 20 spectrometers and scanners are available for use with an array of solid state, solution state, MRI/S (animal and human), MR microscopy and diffusion capabilities and techniques.

map of Tallahassee and Gainesville, Florida

 

Our unique instruments include the 900 MHz 105 mm bore magnet — the world's strongest MRI machine — at our FSU location and a 600 MHz, triple-resonance probe at AMRIS that appears to deliver the highest mass sensitivity of any probe at any frequency, enabling natural-products research when sample size is small or limited.

Magnet time is free and allocated on the basis of scientific peer review; we accept proposals throughout the year. While many users conduct their experiments in person, an increasing number also work remotely with the help of our dedicated staff.

HOW TO APPLY

Our magnets are open to all scientists — for free — via a competitive process; we accept proposals throughout the year.

  1. Prepare documentation
    A proposal and prior results report are required.
  2. Create a user profile
    Returning users simply need to log in.
  3. Submit a request online
    Upload files and provide details about the proposed experiment.
  4. Report your results
    Submit a 1-page report and info on publications resulting from your experiment.

Please review the MagLab User Policies and Procedures before submitting your proposal and experiment or contact NMR-MRI/S Facility Director Tim Cross or AMRIS Facility Director Joanna Long. View User FAQs.

AMRIS

 

Latest Science Highlight


  • NMR-based Metabolomics of Coral with Resistance to Bleaching
    15 May 2019
    NMR-based Metabolomics of Coral with Resistance to Bleaching

    Three variants of the coral species A cervicornis were found to have unique metabolic signatures that can be distinguished by NMR spectroscopy. Differing levels of the metabolite trimethylamine-N-oxide, an important compound that protects against nitrogen overload, can distinguish the three variants studied. Understanding how species vary metabolically, and how that translates to species survival in stressed environments, may help us to establish desirable traits that could help with restoration and other interventions.

    Read more...

Featured Publications

NMR-based Metabolomics of Coral with Resistance to Bleaching

K. E. Lohr, et al., Nature Scientific Reports, 9, 6067 (2019) See Science Highlight or Read online …


Imaging pH levels with a CoII2 MRI Probe

A. E. Thorarinsdottir, et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 139, 15836–15847 (2017) See Science Highlight or Read online …


Imaging current flow in the brain during transcranial electrical stimulation

A. K. Kasinadhuni, et al., Brain Stimulation, 10 (2017) 764-772 See Science Highlight or Read online …


"Bath salt" drugs disrupt brain activity

L. M. Colon-Perez, et al., Neuropsychopharmacology, 4 (9), 2352-65 (2016) See Science Highlight or Read online …

See more AMRIS publications

NMR-MRI/S Facility

 

Latest Science Highlight



Featured Publications

Ultra-high magnetic fields provide new insights into bone-like materials

Bonhomme, C., et al., Chemical Communications, 54 (69), 9591-9594 (2018) See Science Highlight or Read online …


Tracking Lithium Transport Pathways in Solid Electrolytes for Batteries

Zheng, J., et al., Journal of Materials Chemistry A, 2017, DOI: 10.1039/C7TA05832B See Science Highlight or Read online …


MRI illuminates link between heart disease and mood disorders

A. Dossat, et al., The FASEB Journal, 31, 6, 2492-2506 (2017) See Science Highlight or Read online …


Detection of "free" oxide ions in low-silica Ca/Mg silicate glasses: Results from 17O→29Si HETCOR NMR

H.Z. Gan, et al., J. Non-Cryst. Solids, 445-446, 1-6 (2016) See Science Highlight or Read online …

See more NMR-MRI/S Facility publications


For more information

 

Contact NMR-MRI/S Facility Director Tim Cross or AMRIS Facility Director Joanna Long or Fellow users who are experts on the use of NMR-MRI/S Facility.

Last modified on 29 July 2019