Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Resonance Imaging / Spectroscopy

900 MHz 105 mm Bore NMR Magnet

Users Michael Harrington (Huntington Medical Research Institute). left, and Eduard Chekmenev (Vanderbilt University), right , work with staff scientist Victor Schepkin on the 900.

900 MHz 105 mm Bore NMR Magnet

4.7 Tesla 33 cm MRI/S System

Located at AMRIS at our University of Florida campus in Gainesville.

4.7 Tesla 33 cm MRI/S System

Technology Development

We are world leaders in designing and building probes and other NMR-MRI/S instrumentation.

An NMR probe.

High-resolution Imaging

Viewing images obtained with the 3 tesla 90 cm MRI scanner at the Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy Facility at the University of Florida in Gainesville.

MRi images

NMR - MRI/S techniques and instruments are available at two different MagLab facilities in Florida: The NMR-MRI/S Facility at MagLab headquarters near Florida State University in Tallahassee and the Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy Facility (AMRIS) housed within the McKnight Brain Institute at the University of Florida in Gainesville.

Working in tandem, these facilities combine unique magnets, equipment and expert scientific support with advanced capabilities for technique and instrumentation development. About 20 spectrometers and scanners are available for use with an array of solid state, solution state, MRI/S (animal and human), MR microscopy and diffusion capabilities and techniques.

map of Tallahassee and Gainesville, Florida

Our unique instruments include the 900 MHz 105 mm bore magnet — the world's strongest MRI machine — at our FSU location and a 600 MHz, triple-resonance probe at AMRIS that appears to deliver the highest mass sensitivity of any probe at any frequency, enabling natural-products research when sample size is small or limited.

Magnet time is free and allocated on the basis of scientific peer review; we accept proposals throughout the year. While many users conduct their experiments in person, an increasing number also work remotely with the help of our dedicated staff.

HOW TO APPLY

Our magnets are open to all scientists — for free — via a competitive process; we accept proposals throughout the year.

  1. Prepare documentation
    A proposal and prior results report are required.
  2. Create a user profile
    Returning users simply need to log in.
  3. Submit a request online
    Upload files and provide details about the proposed experiment.
  4. Report your results
    Submit a 1-page report and info on publications resulting from your experiment.

Read the User Proposal Policy for complete guidelines or contact NMR-MRI/S Facility Director Tim Cross or AMRIS Facility Director Joanna Long.

AMRIS

Latest Science Highlight



Featured Publications

Single-File Nanochannel Persistence Lengths from NMR

M. Dvoyashkin, et al., Anal. Chem., 286 (4), 2200-2204 (2014) Read online …


Gene transfer of arginine kinase to skeletal muscle using adeno-associated virus

S.C. Forbes, et al., Gene Therapy, 21 (4), 387-392 (2014) Read online …


On Random Walks and Entropy in Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Studies of Neural Tissue

C. Ingo, et al., Magnet. Reson. Med., 71 (2), 617-627 (2014) Read online …


Absolute Magnetic Susceptibility of Rat Brain Tissue

M.K. Peprah, et al., Magnet. Reson. Med., 72, 876-879 (2014) Read online …

See more AMRIS publications

NMR-MRI/S Facility

Latest Science Highlight


  • Metabolic properties in stroked rats revealed by relaxation-enhanced MR spectroscopy at 21.1 T
    17 November 2014
    Metabolic properties in stroked rats revealed by relaxation-enhanced MR spectroscopy at 21.1 T

    By coupling selective band excitation of metabolites with high magnetic fields, relaxation-enhanced 1H MR spectroscopy can be performed in living specimen and patients to achieve high sensitivity over very short acquisition times for the examination of cellular dysfunction. This sensitivity can be used to evaluate otherwise inaccessible metabolites or regions of the proton spectral regime and can be used to probe cell-specific environments, such as neurons versus astrocytes, that may undergo differential changes during dysregulation.

    Read more...

Featured Publications

Multimodal nanoprobes to target cerebrovascular amyloid in Alzheimer’s disease brain

K.M. Jaruszewski, et al., Biomaterials, 35(6):1967-76 (2014) Read online …


Binding of MgtR, a Salmonella Transmembrane Regulatory Peptide, to MgtC, a Mycobacterium tuberculosis Virulence Factor: A Structural Study

F.L. Jean-Francois, et al., J. Mol. Biol., 426:436-446. PMID: 24140750. (2014) Read online …


In vivo chlorine and sodium MRI of rat brain at 21.1 T

V.D. Schepkin, et al., Magn. Reson. Mater. Phy., 27:63-70. (2014) Read online …


Progressive supranuclear palsy: high-field-strength MR microscopy in the human substantia nigra and globus pallidus

P. Foroutan, et al., Radiology, Jan;266(1):280-8. (2013) Read online …

See more NMR-MRI/S Facility publications


For more information contact NMR-MRI/S Facility Director Tim Cross or AMRIS Facility Director Joanna Long

Last modified on 10 October 2014