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The MagLab is funded by the National Science Foundation and the State of Florida.

Energy & Materials MRI

This includes High-field Contrast Mechanisms and Agents, Lithium Battery MRI, Materials MRI and STRAFI.

Details

With the commissioning of stronger magnets for MRI at the MagLab, challenges arise with existing contrast agents such as iron oxides and gadolinium-based (Gd) agents. Many new opportunities for novel agents emerge, such as dysprosium-based (Dy) agents that can enhance sensitivity at these field strengths. Today, the most common contrast agents are iron oxide-based agents, which provide a hypointense signal due to their susceptibility-induced gradients, causing a dephasing of proximal spins. Although the iron particles are saturated at fields up to 1 tesla, the increased susceptibility artifacts can still provide increased contrast, especially with T2* weighted sequences.

At the MagLab, we use a variety of iron-based agents. Most common are the commercial super paramagnetic iron oxides (SPIO) that are either micron-sized (MPIO) or nanometer-sized (USPIO). These agents are used for a variety of applications. We currently use them for cell labeling and in vivo tracking of endogenously or exogenously labeled stem cells. We also collaborate with Florida State University’s Chemistry Department and other institutions to modify these SPIOs for multimodality properties and to develop novel contrast agents such as Dy-conjugated quantum dots. Dy, in contrast to the commonly used Gd agents, show increased relaxivity with higher field strengths. Recently, we have also investigated Dy and Gd conjugated ultra-short carbon nanotubes (DNT and GNT, respectively) in collaboration with Rice University.

We are always interested in working with collaborators to investigate high-field MRI contrast agents. We can either provide contrast agents for your research needs, such as cell tracking, or collaborate to develop novel, high-field agents. The 21.1 tesla magnet, with its commercial and homebuilt coils, can accommodate a wide verity of samples, ranging from in vitro solutions and cell samples to animal models. In addition, we have access to other lower-field magnets that can be used for these purposes.

The following instruments at AMRIS facility are available for this technique:

The following instruments at NMR facility are available for this technique:

This following probes can be used with this technique:

  • 21.1 tesla MRI probe for in-vivo imaging of rats with multiple 1H and 1H–X head coils (NHMFL #35)
  • 21.1 tesla Micro2.5 probe for ex vivo or in vitro MRI with multiple 1H coils (Bruker H13398)
  • 11.75 tesla MRI probe for ex vivo, in vitro or in vivo MRI with multiple 1H volume coils

For more information, please contact Sam Grant in Tallahassee or Glenn Walter at AMRIS in Gainesville.

For information, please contact Yan-Yan Hu.

This following instruments can be used with this technique:

This following probes can be used with this technique:

  • 21.1 Tesla MRI probe for in-vivo imaging of rats with multiple 1H and 1H–X head coils (NHMFL #35)

For more information, please contact Sam Grant in Tallahassee.

Stray-field-imaging (STRAFI) technique utilizes a very large field-gradient in the fringe field of a magnet to significantly improve the image resolution of solid materials. A STRAFI probe is available to users of the 830 MHz ultra-narrow bore magnet.

This following instruments can be used with this technique:

This following probes can be used with this technique:

  • NHMFL Stray Field Imaging probe (NHMFL) for battery studies

For more information, please contact Riqiang Fu.

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Last modified on 28 December 2022

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