This research clarifies fundamental relationships between magnetism, superconductivity and the nature of the enigmatic “pseudogap state" in cuprate superconductors. The discovery provides an additional puzzle piece in the theoretical understanding of high-temperature superconductors - a key towards improving and utilizing these materials for technological applications.

Superconductors conduct large amounts of electricity without losses. They are also used to create very large magnetic fields, for example in MRI machines, to study materials and medicine. Here, researchers developed a fast, new "smart" technique to measure how much current a superconductor can carry using very high pulsed magnetic fields.

Tests of the first Integrated Coil Form test coil wound using REBCO superconducting tape show promise for use in ultra powerful magnets of the future.

Emergence of unusual metallic state supports role of "charge stripes" in formation of charge-carrier pairs essential to resistance-free flow of electrical current.

The compact coil could lead to a new generation of magnets for biomedical research, nuclear fusion reactors and many applications in between.

With funding from the National Science Foundation, scientists and engineers will determine the best way to build a new class of record-breaking instruments.

MagLab experts fine-tuned a furnace for pressure-cooking a novel superconducting magnet. Now they're about to build its big brother.

A material already known for its unique behavior is found to carry current in a way never before observed.

MagLab-industry partnership ups the critical current density of this high-temperature superconductor by a third.

Game-changing technology may hold the key to ever-stronger magnets needed by scientists.

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