20 March 2019

Scientists identify potential biomarker for brain diseases

Quantitative chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) signals obtained on a rat brain with a tumor (red circled region). Quantitative chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) signals obtained on a rat brain with a tumor (red circled region).

With advanced techniques and world-record magnetic fields, researchers have detected new MRI signals from brain tumors.

What did scientists discover?

By coupling the National MagLab's powerful, one-of-a-kind 21.1-tesla MRI magnet with novel techniques, researchers found new potential disease markers for brain tumors. The scientists used a novel image contrast technique called chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST), as well as advanced signal processing algorithms, to acquire these detailed images.

THE TOOLS THEY USED

This research was conducted in the MagLab's 900 MHz Ultra-Wide-Bore NMR/MRI Magnet system at the MagLab's NMR/MRI Facility.

Why is this important?

This study demonstrates how ultra-high magnetic fields can help detect new biomarkers for cancer and elucidate biochemical interactions within tumors.

Who did the research?

Tangi Roussel1, Jens T. Rosenberg2, Samuel C. Grant2,3, Lucio Frydman1,2

1Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel; 2National MagLab, FSU; 3FAMU‐FSU College of Engineering, FSU

Why did they need the MagLab?

This study required the high, homogenous magnetic field of the MagLab's world-record 21.1-tesla MRI magnet as well as its uniquely large experimental space, which could accommodate the rodents studied during this experiment.

Details for scientists

Funding

This research was funded by the following grants: G.S. Boebinger (NSF DMR-1157490, NSF DMR-1644779); S.C Grant (UCGP, AHA 10GRNT3860040, NIH RO1-NS102395); L Frydman (ISF/NSFC 2508/17, ERC-2016-PoC #751106)


For more information, contact Jens Rosenberg.

Details

  • Research Area: Biochemistry, Biology, Magnet Resonance Technique Development
  • Research Initiatives: Life
  • Facility / Program: NMR/MRI
  • Year: 2019
Last modified on 20 March 2019