New materials that exhibit a strong coupling between magnetic and electric effects are of great interest for the development of high-sensitivity detectors and other devices. This paper reports on such a coupling in a specially designed material.

Discovery of a new kind of electron spin superstructure in crystals opens the tantalizing prospect of finding other emergent exotic phases.

High magnetic fields have been shown to induce strong electric polarizations in the doped organic quantum magnet, dichloro-tetrakis-thiourea, or DTN. The introduction of disorder in DTN leads to the formation of Bose glass states and the electric polarization is particularly enhanced at the transitions to the glass state.

Magnetic systems provide controllable “model” systems to study interacting many body quantum effects, relevant to poorly understood problems beyond the realm of magnetism. For example, disorder leads to Bose glass behavior, enabling study of the Bose-glass to BEC transition in quantum magnets — a key component to understanding the superconductor-to-insulator quantum phase transition. High magnetic fields drive Bose glasses into Bose-Einstein condensates.