This study reports the first transition metal compounds featuring mixed fluoride–cyanide ligands. A significant enhancement of the magnetic anisotropy, as compared to the pure fluoride ligated compounds, is demonstrated by combined analysis of high-field electron paramagnetic resonance (HF-EPR) spectroscopy and magnetization measurements.

Electron spin resonance work shows how transition metal can retain quantum information, important work on the path to next-generation quantum technologies.

With just a drop of water, a cobalt-based material changes both color and magnetic properties.

In the field of inorganic chemistry, magneto-structural correlations have been used to rationally design molecules with desirable properties, and to relate these properties to the electronic and geometric structures. In turn, such studies provide powerful tools for understanding important catalytic processes, as well as elucidating the structures of active sites in metalloproteins. This study reveals an unusually strong sensitivity of the magnetic properties of a CoS4 molecule to minute changes in its structure.

This approach to building “qubits” could be a promising tool for developing quantum computers.

Scientists created a molecular nanomagnet based on a single nickel atom with record-high magnetic anisotropy — a quality that makes it a promising building block for applications like memory storage.