Research sheds new light on the formation of harmful structures that can lead to neurodegenerative diseases.

A lot of the research conducted in powerful magnets ends up having a powerful effect on our day-to-day lives.

New technique could lead to precise, personalized cancer diagnosis and monitoring.

In the field of inorganic chemistry, magneto-structural correlations have been used to rationally design molecules with desirable properties, and to relate these properties to the electronic and geometric structures. In turn, such studies provide powerful tools for understanding important catalytic processes, as well as elucidating the structures of active sites in metalloproteins. This study reveals an unusually strong sensitivity of the magnetic properties of a CoS4 molecule to minute changes in its structure.

The MagLab’s 21-tesla FT-ICR magnet can identify human proteins far more efficiently than commercial instruments, a boon for medical research.

Explore one of the MagLab's newest world-record magnets through this interactive feature.

Across disciplines, exciting stuff happens along the boundaries between things. What makes those realms so rich for research, and how do magnets shed light on them?

Research sheds important light on the fundamental process of cell division.

It's freaking hard to examine proteins closely in their native habitat. With the help of very clever magnet instrumentation, University of Texas scientist Kendra Frederick is up for the challenge.

This week at the lab, a prosaic-looking box is being prepared to assume a very exciting job this summer as a key component to a scientific time machine.

Although researchers won't be able to use the approximately 4-foot-high box to travel to other eras, they will use it to get a tantalizing glimpse of science in the future.

Delivered to the lab last week from Switzerland, the "box" is in fact a one-of-a-kind console specifically designed and built by Bruker Corp. for a new, one-of-a-kind instrument, the MagLab's 36 tesla series connected hybrid (SCH) magnet. Due to come online in a few months, the SCH will offer the highest magnetic fields in the world for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) research. With an operating frequency of 1.5 gigahertz, it will be one and a half times stronger than any other NMR magnet, said Ilya Litvak, who is coordinating the NMR instrumentation for the new magnet.

The MagLab already has numerous magnets for NMR, used to study the structure of molecules by interacting with the nuclei of atoms such as hydrogen, nitrogen and carbon. What's special about the new magnet is that, operating at 1.5 gigahertz, it will allow scientists to efficiently target so-called "low-gamma" nuclei such as oxygen, which are too hard to see at conventional NMR field strengths, opening up a whole new frontier for scientific exploration.

"In the two areas where structure is important, biological research and materials, you have a lot of oxygen," said Litvak. "Currently, scientists cannot use oxygen in NMR efficiently."

A Bruker engineer is testing the new console with another magnet while construction on the SCH magnet is completed. In NMR experiments, the console receives and records the signals sent to it by the probe, which holds the sample inside the magnet.


Text by Kristen Coyne, photo by Stephen Bilenky.

Page 1 of 2