This highlight focuses on the development of new thermometry required to study quantum materials and phenomena in high magnetic fields and at ultralow temperatures. The team has demonstrated that exceedingly small quartz tuning forks bathed in liquid 3He maintain a constant calibration that is magnetic field independent, thereby opening the use of these devices as new sensors of the response of quantum systems.

A pane of window glass and a piece of quartz are both are transparent to light, but their atomic structure is very different. Quartz is crystalline at the atomic level while window glass is amorphous. This can also occur with magnetism at the atomic level in solids containing magnetic states such as antiferromagnetism (ordered) and spin-glass (disorded). This work describes the interaction (exchange bias) between ordered and disordered magnetic states and how the magnetic properties of the material are altered as a result.

Nuclear magnetic resonance measurements were performed in the all-new 32 T superconducting magnet in an effort to confirm a new quantum state. Results confirm the game-changing nature of this magnet.

A new experimental technique allowed physicists to precisely probe the electron spins of an intriguing compound and uncover unexpected behavior.

Research on doped SrCu2(BO3)2 shows anomalies in the magnetization.

In Sr3NiIrO6 vibrations in the crystal lattice (phonons) play an important role in its intriguing magnetic properties that result in a very high coercive field of 55 T. Using a combination of pulsed and DC magnetic fields coupled with magnetization and far-infrared spectroscopy, researchers were able to conclusively link the phonons to the magnetic behavior.

Using intense pulsed magnetic fields and measurements at low temperatures, MagLab users have found evidence of a long-sought “spin liquid” in terbium indium oxide (TbInO3)

With a prestigious prize from the National Science Foundation, MagLab physicist Christianne Beekman will do "atomic-level engineering" on ultra-thin materials with promising properties.

This MagLab user talks about meeting Leonardo da Vinci, making magnetic soup and the freedom of being a scientist.

Discovery could help scientists better understand exotic behaviors of electrons.

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