Alan Marshall has been named a fellow of the National Academy of Inventors.

A MagLab chemist has won a prestigious award from the American Association for the Advancement of Science that recognizes promising female scientists in the early stages of their career.

Combining tremendous strength with a high-quality field, the MagLab’s newest instrument promises big advances in interdisciplinary research.

Scientists have discovered and characterized an unusual, complex natural product produced in worms, a finding that suggests a whole body of discoveries awaits.

With a sufficiently high magnetic field, scientists can manipulate certain phase transitions in some molecules, a discovery that hints at future technological applications.

Scientists analyzing maize affected by southern leaf blight determine the molecular structures of so-called “death acids.”

Used to perform complex chemical analysis, this magnet offers researchers the world's highest field for ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) mass spectrometry.

A recent high-field EPR study by MagLab users from Wayne State and Grand Valley State Universities has demonstrated that minor changes in the periphery of a nickel-containing molecule can lead to a dramatic reorganization of its electron distribution. This in turn, induces a major shift in the reactivity of this compound.

State-of-the-art ion cyclotron resonance magnet system offers researchers significantly more power and accuracy than ever before.

Ten years ago the 900 Ultra-Wide Bore magnet became available to an international user community for Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and Magnetic Resonance Imaging at the National High Magnetic Field Lab. Since then 69 publications have been published from this instrument spanning many disciplines and the number of publications per year continues to increase with 26 in just the past 18 months demonstrating that state of the art data continues to be collected on this superb magnet.

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