Ten years ago the 900 Ultra-Wide Bore magnet became available to an international user community for Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and Magnetic Resonance Imaging at the National High Magnetic Field Lab. Since then 69 publications have been published from this instrument spanning many disciplines and the number of publications per year continues to increase with 26 in just the past 18 months demonstrating that state of the art data continues to be collected on this superb magnet.

Pyrolysis of solid biomass, in this case pine pellets and peanut hulls, generates a hydrocarbon-rich liquid product (bio-oil) consisting of oily and aqueous phases. Here, each phase is characterized by negative-ion electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI FT-ICR MS) to yield unique chemical formulas for thousands of compounds.

Renowned chemist Sir Harold Kroto, a Nobel Laureate in chemistry and MagLab user, died April 30, 2016. He was 76.

Harry KrotoHarry Kroto.

Kroto, whose 1996 Nobel Prize recognized his key role in the discovery of fullerenes, spent the last decade of his eminent career at Florida State University, where access to the MagLab was a big draw.

During those years in Tallahassee, Kroto was principal investigator on half a dozen experiments in the Ion Cyclotron Resonance Facility. Collaborations with the MagLab’s Alan Marshall, Naresh Dalal, Paul Dunk and others yielded numerous publications on fullerenes, metal organic framework systems and other topics.

In a 2014 interview done for FSU’s Across the Spectrum magazine, Kroto cited his work at the MagLab and FSU as “some of the best work I’ve done.”

“Very beautiful,” said Kroto, “well up there intellectually with my previous work, so I am very happy with that.”

Kroto also devoted much of his life to educating and inspiring students and lay people across the globe about science.

Scientists have discovered and characterized an unusual, complex natural product produced in worms, a finding that suggests a whole body of discoveries awaits.

MagLab users have employed a combination of ab-initio theory and a newly developed high-pressure, high-field ferromagnetic resonance technique, which is uniquely sensitive to anisotropic magnetic interactions, to gain insights into the importance of spin-orbit coupling effects in a range of organic materials where this effect is usually considered to be small. The findings may be applicable to topics as diverse as spintronics and topological spin phases.

The MagLab’s 21-tesla FT-ICR magnet can identify human proteins far more efficiently than commercial instruments, a boon for medical research.

Square-planar high-spin Fe(II) molecular compounds are rare. Using an easily modifiable pincer-type ligand, the successful synthesis of the first compound of this type that breaks the FeO4 motif was achieved, and the first spectroscopic evidence that the geometry and spin state persist in solution was obtained.

Scientists analyzing maize affected by southern leaf blight determine the molecular structures of so-called “death acids.”

Researchers from the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory user program performed high-frequency (329 GHz) electron magnetic resonance (EMR) experiments to address questions of fundamental importance in catalysis 1) improving industrial production of ammonia and ammonia-derived fertilizers, and 2) understanding of the atmospheric nitrogen cycle.

Atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) provides ultrahigh resolving power (m/Δm50% > 1,000,000 at m/z 500) and sub-ppm mass error (50 ppb) required to identify nickel porphyrin isotopes for unambiguous elemental composition assignment. We also report the first simultaneous identification and categorization of both vanadyl and nickel porphyrins in the same sample, without prior sample fractionation.

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