Finding could make pricey, massive scanners a thing of the past.

This high-field EPR study of the H-Mn2+ content in the bacterium Deinococcus Radiodurans provides the strongest known biological indicator of cellular ionizing radiation resistance between and within the three domains of the tree of life, with potential applications including optimization of radiotherapy.

Members of a sprawling science team piece together the puzzle of biochar, a promising tool in the fight against global warming.

A magnet-powered synchrotron at the first major international research center in the Middle East aims to draw scientists into cross-cultural collaborations.

High-field data comes in a boggling array of shapes, squiggles and colors. Play along as we try to figure out what it all means.

A unique way to bond together single-layer semiconductors opens a door to new nanotechnologies.

Paul Dunk, a chemist in the MagLab's Ion Cyclotron Resonance Facility, has published a paper on so-called "nanocages" formed by combining graphite, a two-dimensional form of carbon, with different metals. The research, Transformation of doped graphite into cluster-encapsulated fullerene cages, appeared this week in Nature Communications.

For the research, Dunk and his collaborators created metallofullerenes, molecules that consist of a ball-like carbon structure that encompasses several atoms inside of it — hence the term "nanocage."

Dunk and his colleagues tested theories of how these compounds form by looking for hypothesized intermediate molecules between the original reactants and end products. They demonstrated that, unlike what many scientists believed, the cages do not shrink from or break off of larger globs of carbon, but rather nucleate around the metal, carbon atom by carbon atom.

The findings could help in the future development of nanocage-related technologies ranging from new light-based electronics to molecular electronics.

Dunk's research was done in collaboration with scientists at the Universitat Rovira i Virgili in Spain and the University of Texas at El Paso.

Read more about this research in the MagLab's fields magazine.

Image of nanocages by Paul Dunk/Caroline McNiel.

Scientists can now observe lithium moving through an electrolyte in real time.

From nanorockets to nanocages, good science can come in tiny packages — all with the aim of solving really big problems.

A lot of the research conducted in powerful magnets ends up having a powerful effect on our day-to-day lives.

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