20 June 2019

Fifty Percent Boost for Niobium–tin

Non-Cu Jc-B curves of the APC wire given various heat treatments and the state-of-the-art Nb3Sn wire as reference, as well as the FCC Jc specification Non-Cu Jc-B curves of the APC wire given various heat treatments and the state-of-the-art Nb3Sn wire as reference, as well as the FCC Jc specification

MagLab users have modified the critical current of Nb3SN, a material that was thought to be fully exploited, and boosted its performance by 50%.

THE TOOLS THEY USED

This research was conducted in the 31 Tesla, 50 mm Bore Magnet at the DC Field Facility.

What did scientists discover?

Recently-developed superconductor wires, based on widely used Nb3Sn, have discovered a new technique to make finer crystalline grains and pin magnetic flux while carrying an electrical current in high magnetic fields. These new wires have shown impressive increases in operational magnetic field ranges as well as improved current carrying properties at high magnetic fields. This improvement in current-carrying capability is significant – a 50% increase - for a practical superconductor long thought, until now, to be fully developed with little room for improvement.

Why is this important?

This is an important practical and engineering result. It meets the performance thought to be needed for the proposed Future Circular Collider; a multi-billion-dollar particle accelerator proposed to advance the highest reaches of high energy physics. This wire could also impact medical devices for high field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and ultra-high-field Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) applications, such as brain imaging.

Who did the research?

M. D. Sumption1, X. Xu2, J. Rochester1, X. Peng3, E. W. Collings1

1The Ohio State University; 2Fermilab; 3Hyper Tech Research Inc.

Why did they need the MagLab?

The high fields available at the MagLab were critical to this research.  Such measurements require magnetic fields that exceed the upper operational fields (critical fields, Bc2) of these advanced wires (Bc2 ~ 28T at 4.2 K). Our measurements also required the ability to supply large currents in applied fields from 15-25 T. Only the MagLab can provide such facilities.

Details for scientists

Funding

This research was funded by the following grants: G.S. Boebinger (NSF DMR-1157490); X. Xu (Fermilab LDRD); X. Peng, M. D. Sumption (US DOE SBIR)


For more information, contact Tim Murphy.

Details

  • Research Area: Superconductivity - Applied
  • Research Initiatives: Materials
  • Facility / Program: DC Field
  • Year: 2019
Last modified on 20 September 2019