The work gives physicists a new tool for exploring and understanding a class of materials that could lead to faster electronics.

At the National MagLab, scientists have been experimenting for years on materials first dreamed up by the newest physics Nobel laureates decades ago.

New research published this week in Nature Physics explores a material that could play a key role in realizing spin-based electronics.

Discovering previously unobserved quantum states nested inside the quantum Hall effect in a single-layer form of carbon known as graphene, researchers have found evidence of a new state of matter that challenges scientists' understanding of collective electron behavior.

New kind of quantum Hall state observed in graphene superlattices.

A topological insulator is a time reversal symmetry preserving material with a non-trivial topological order, which behaves as an insulator in the bulk although its surface is conducting.

The work by Chen et. al. explores the quantum hall effect (QHE) that develops in BiSbTeSe2 at low temperatures and high magnetic fields. BiSbTeSe2 is a topological insulator, meaning it is a bulk insulating material that at low temperatures develops a quantum mechanical state that allows conduction of electrons at the surface similar to a metal. The observation of the QHE in BiSbTeSe2 is further confirmation of the theory governing these unique materials.

SmB6 has been studied for a number of years and its observed behavior had presented investigators with a conflicting set of observations that resisted explanation until recently. The observation of quantum oscillations by Li et. al. in what is a bulk insulator confirm that SmB6 becomes a topological insulator at low temperatures. A topological insulator is a material that develops a unique quantum mechanical state on its surface, which allows electrons to flow in a fashion similar to a metal.

High magnetic fields reveal the electronic interactions underlying high-temperature superconductivity in the iron pnictides. This research unifies the superconducting phase diagram of the pnictides with those of other quantum critical, high-temperature superconductors, such at the cuprates.

Researchers from Columbia University working at the MagLab have observed a physical phenomenon in bilayer graphene that could usher in a new generation of quantum computers.

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