In the 14 years since its discovery, graphene has amazed scientists around the world with both the ground-breaking physics and technological potential it displays. Recently, scientists from Penn State University added to graphene's gallery of impressive scientific achievements and constructed a map that will aid future exploration of this material. This work is emblematic of the large number of university-based materials research efforts that use the MagLab to explore the frontiers of science.

Researchers discover that Sr1-yMn1-zSb2 (y,z < 0.1) is a so-called Weyl material that holds great promise for building devices that require far less power.

Looking for better ways to power electronics, topological semimetals may hold the answer.

Across disciplines, exciting stuff happens along the boundaries between things. What makes those realms so rich for research, and how do magnets shed light on them?

This area of research could help scientists understand high-temperature superconductivity and other mysteries.

The work gives physicists a new tool for exploring and understanding a class of materials that could lead to faster electronics.

At the National MagLab, scientists have been experimenting for years on materials first dreamed up by the newest physics Nobel laureates decades ago.

New research published this week in Nature Physics explores a material that could play a key role in realizing spin-based electronics.

Discovering previously unobserved quantum states nested inside the quantum Hall effect in a single-layer form of carbon known as graphene, researchers have found evidence of a new state of matter that challenges scientists' understanding of collective electron behavior.

New kind of quantum Hall state observed in graphene superlattices.

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