Interactions between electrons underpin some of the most interesting – and useful -- effects in materials science and condensed-matter physics. This work demonstrates that, in the new family of so-called "monolayer semiconductors" that are only one atomic layer thick, electron-electron interactions can lead to the sudden and spontaneous formation of a magnetized state, analogous to the appearance of magnetism in conventional materials like iron.

Topology, screws, spin and hedgehogs are words not normally found in the same scientific article but with the discovery of Weyl fermions in thin tellurine films they actually belong together. The work in this highlight describes how Qui et. al. used the unique properties of tellurine and high magnetic fields to identify the existence of Weyl fermions in a semiconductor. This discovery opens a new window into the intriguing world to topological materials.

Move aside, electrons; it's time to make way for the trion.

Promising technique could be used to turn light into electricity and electricity into light.

This research established experimental evidence for the long sought-after transition of a small, two-dimensional sheet of electrons to a solid state.

Analogous to the unique spectral fingerprint of any atom or molecule, researchers have measured the spectrum of optical excitations in monolayer tungsten diselenide (WSe2), which is a member of a new family of ultrathin semiconductors that are just one atomic layer thick.

Scientists discovered how to tune the optical properties of atomically-thin semiconductors, which will aid the design of future microscopic light sensors.

Scientists begin to fill in the blanks on transition metal dichalcogenides.

Studies of the magnetotransport of strongly interacting 2D holes in high mobility, gated, GaAs quantum wells have been carried out a very low temperatures to search for possible anisotropy in the field-induced re-entrant insulating phase. The latter phase was observed in the resistivity at a magnetic field that depended on hole density but that was independent of current direction. This shows that the re-entrant insulating phase is not due to a proposed anisotropic stripe order, but is instead caused by Wigner crystallization.

Black Phosphorus is a layered semiconducting material that can be thinned down to produce atomically thin crystals. These resulting crystals produce a two-dimensional electron gas 2DEG from the resulting quantum confinement of the electrons. Significant differences exist between the physical properties of the atomically thin crystals versus that of the bulk crystals. Zhang and co-workers were able to observe quantum oscillations  in black phosphorus allowing the characteristics of the 2DEG in atomically thin crystals to be elucidated.

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