Researchers discover that Sr1-yMn1-zSb2 (y,z < 0.1) is a so-called Weyl material that holds great promise for building devices that require far less power.

The novel behavior could help scientists better understand the mechanisms behind high-temperature superconductivity.

At high magnetic field, free-flowing particles condense into “puddles.”

The work gives physicists a new tool for exploring and understanding a class of materials that could lead to faster electronics.

Using the 35 T and 45T magnet systems, coupled with high pressures up to 1.47 GPa, researchers at the Magnet Lab have observed a massive, pressure induced change in the Fermi surface of elemental chromium. Part of this reorganization results in the creation of quantum interference oscillations at high pressures which behave differently from those arising from standard Landau quantization.