Research at the MagLab

Researchers at the MagLab are making discoveries today that will lead to the technologies of tomorrow. Whether a member of one of our robust in-house research groups or one of the nearly 1,400 outside scientists who do experiments here annually, MagLab researchers understand how high magnetic fields lead to making big discoveries.

Seeking the most powerful magnetic fields on Earth, scientists and engineers from across the world come to the MagLab to explore promising new materials, solve energy challenges and grow our understanding of living things. This kind of research has played a critical role in developing new technologies used every day – from electric lights and computers to motors, plastics, high-speed trains and MRI. Find out more by exploring our research initiatives, learning about our interdisciplinary research, or digging deeper into the hundreds of publications generated annually by MagLab researchers.

 

Research Initiatives

graphene

MATERIALS

Scientists use our magnets to explore semiconductors, superconductors, newly-grown crystals, buckyballs and materials from the natural world — research that reveals the secret workings of materials and empowers us to develop new technologies.

Read more …

petroleum

ENERGY

Scientists here are working to optimize petroleum refining, advance potential bio-fuels such as pine needles and algae, and fundamentally change the way we store and deliver energy by developing better batteries.

Read more …

brain

LIFE

With the world’s strongest MRI magnet, scientists here study everything from living animals to individual cells, from proteins to disease-fighting molecules found in plants and animals — work that could improve treatment of AIDS, cancer, Alzheimer’s and other diseases.

Read more …

 

Latest Science Highlight


  • Novel metallofullerene boosts dynamic nuclear polarization
    17 April 2018
    Novel metallofullerene boosts dynamic nuclear polarization

    In this study, researchers added a low concentration of the endohedral metallofullerene (EMF) Gd2@C79N to DNP samples, finding that 1H and 13C enhancements increased by 40% and 50%, respectively, at 5 teslas and 1.2 Kelvin.

  • Ceramic insulation for high-temperature superconducting wire
    19 March 2018
    Ceramic insulation for high-temperature superconducting wire

    MagLab scientists and engineers have developed a special coating on Bi-2212 superconducting wire for electrical insulation in superconducting magnets that will enable the wire to be used in ultra-high field nuclear magnetic resonance magnets.

See all Science Highlights

Featured Publications


Novel Metallofullerene Boosts Dynamic Nuclear Polarization, X. Wang, et al., Chem. Comm., 54, 2425-2428 (2018) See Science Highlight or Read online 

Ceramic Insulation for High-Temperature Superconducting Wire, H.Kandel, et al., Supercond. Sci. Technol., 28 (3) 035010 (2015) See Science Highlight or Read online 

Switchable Transmission of Quantum Hall Edge States in Bilayer Graphene, J. Li, et al., Physical Review Letters, 120, 057701 (2018) See Science Highlight or Read online 

Targeted Annotation of Peptides by Selective Infrared Multiphoton Dissociation Mass Spectrometry, N.B. Borotto, et al., Analytical Chemistry, 89, 8304-8310 (2017) See Science Highlight or Read online 

Exciton States in a New Monolayer Semiconductor, A.V. Stier, et al., Physical Review Letters, 120, 057405 (2018) See Science Highlight or Read online 

A magnetic topological semimetal Sr1-yMn1-zSb2(y, z < 0.1), J.Y. Liu, et al., Nature Materials, 16, 905–910 (2017) See Science Highlight or Read online 

Bi-2223 High-Temperature Superconducting Test Coils for NMR Magnets, W.S. Marshall, et al., IEEE Trans Appl Supercond, 27, 4, (2017) See Science Highlight or Read online 

Reversible magnetic switching in a new multifunctional molecular material, J. Vallejo, et al., Chem. Sci. 8, 3694-3702 (2017) See Science Highlight or Read online 

Last modified on 18 April 2018