Ultrafast manipulation of material properties with light could stimulate the development of novel electronics, including quantum computers.

This MagLab user talks about meeting Leonardo da Vinci, making magnetic soup and the freedom of being a scientist.

Physicists prove a 30-year-old theory — the even-denominator fractional quantum Hall state — and establish bilayer graphene as a promising platform that could lead to quantum computation.

This approach to building “qubits” could be a promising tool for developing quantum computers.

Discovering previously unobserved quantum states nested inside the quantum Hall effect in a single-layer form of carbon known as graphene, researchers have found evidence of a new state of matter that challenges scientists' understanding of collective electron behavior.

When a grad student's first publication lands in the top-tier journal Nature, you can bet it's not beginner's luck.

Findings published today in Nature may advance the era of quantum computers.

A material that you may never have heard of could be paving the way for a new electronic revolution.

Researchers investigating a strange material show how it could advance the development of next-generation transistors for the superfast electronics of tomorrow.

Researchers from Columbia University working at the MagLab have observed a physical phenomenon in bilayer graphene that could usher in a new generation of quantum computers.