No insulation? No problem! In fact, by challenging the conventions of magnet making, MagLab engineers created a first-of-its-kind magnet that has only just begun to make records.

Niobium diselenide is found to retain its superconductivity even under very high magnetic fields.

Team opens new path for understanding hidden order.

Just as all matter may exist in the three famous everyday phases — solid, liquid and gas — complex materials may exist in a combination of subtle phases not apparent to the eye. This finding shows that a class of materials, which all contain copper oxide and are known to exhibit a variety of subtle phases, may have even more complexity than thought. And, in fact, some phases are brought about not by changes in temperature but magnetic field.

Experiment marks first time an iron-based high-temperature superconductor works as a strong magnet.

One of the best tools for testing new materials for the next generation of research magnets is a MagLab magnet.

Two researchers play with nanostructures in a fun, fertile physics playground: the space between two things.

Using magnetic fields of over 90 T, the effective mass in the high-Tc superconductor YBa2Cu3O6+x was shown to be strongly enhanced as the material is doped toward optimal Tc.

The work by Dagan et. al. explores the emergence and coexistence of superconductivity and magnetism at the interface between insulating, non-magnetic LaAlO3 and SrTiO3 nanowires at low temperatures. The effect of the antiparallel magnetic order on the resistance of the 50 nm wide patterned wires follows the form of giant magnetoresistance (GMR) at low applied magnetic fields.

Are electrons stronger in pairs? MagLab physicists released new research published in Nature Communications that could help answer a looming question about the strength of Cooper pairs in high temperature superconducting materials.

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