The finding in fullerides opens a new way of exploring the role electron interactions play in high-temperature superconductivity

At the National MagLab and other labs across the globe, the race to discover ever-warmer superconductors is heating up. Find out what these materials are, what they’re good for and why this field is red hot.

Pack a sack lunch and load up! We're hitting the road to learn how this massive magnet tracks sodium moving through your brain.

Hop on this information train for a step-by-step look at how one physicist uses magnets to understand superconductors, spin liquids and why some materials get frustrated.

Scientists discovered how strong of a magnetic field was necessary to suppress superconductivity in a thin film of iron-selenium.

No insulation? No problem! In fact, by challenging the conventions of magnet making, MagLab engineers created a first-of-its-kind magnet that has only just begun to make records.

Niobium diselenide is found to retain its superconductivity even under very high magnetic fields.

Team opens new path for understanding hidden order.

Just as all matter may exist in the three famous everyday phases — solid, liquid and gas — complex materials may exist in a combination of subtle phases not apparent to the eye. This finding shows that a class of materials, which all contain copper oxide and are known to exhibit a variety of subtle phases, may have even more complexity than thought. And, in fact, some phases are brought about not by changes in temperature but magnetic field.

Experiment marks first time an iron-based high-temperature superconductor works as a strong magnet.

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