Electron spin resonance work shows how transition metal can retain quantum information, important work on the path to next-generation quantum technologies.

Ernesto Bosque is helping to develop a promising superconductor into tomorrow's powerful electromagnets.

A nematic phase is where the molecular/atomic dynamics show elements of both liquids and solids, like in liquid crystal displays on digital watches or calculators. Using high magnetic fields and high pressure, researchers probed the electronic states of an iron-based superconductor and found that its nematic state weakened superconductivity.

Ce3TiSb5 identified as a metallic magnet in which inverse melting does occur.

Studies of uranium ditelluride in high magnetic fields show superconductivity switching off at 35 T, but reoccurring at higher magnetic fields between 40 and 65 T.

Research on doped SrCu2(BO3)2 shows anomalies in the magnetization.

Small additions of elemental Hafnium boosts current-carrying capability in Nb3Sn superconductor.

In Sr3NiIrO6 vibrations in the crystal lattice (phonons) play an important role in its intriguing magnetic properties that result in a very high coercive field of 55 T. Using a combination of pulsed and DC magnetic fields coupled with magnetization and far-infrared spectroscopy, researchers were able to conclusively link the phonons to the magnetic behavior.

And now for something completely different: 10 high-field physics predictions that Monty Python nailed.

What hides behind the elegantly simple line that describes the relationship between temperature and electrical resistance in certain materials? For some physicists, this is the most compelling question in the field.

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