Alan Marshall has been named a fellow of the National Academy of Inventors.

Kristina HakanssonKristina Håkansson.

Kristina “Kicki” Håkansson, a professor of chemistry at the University of Michigan and a user of the MagLab’s ICR Facility, has been awarded the 2016 Biemann Medal from the American Society for Mass Spectrometry. This prestigious prize is awarded to individuals early in their careers in recognition of significant achievements in basic or applied mass spectrometry. She will receive the award at the 2016 ASMS conference in June where she will give the Biemann Medal Lecture. Read more.

Renowned chemist Sir Harold Kroto, a Nobel Laureate in chemistry and MagLab user, died April 30, 2016. He was 76.

Harry KrotoHarry Kroto.

Kroto, whose 1996 Nobel Prize recognized his key role in the discovery of fullerenes, spent the last decade of his eminent career at Florida State University, where access to the MagLab was a big draw.

During those years in Tallahassee, Kroto was principal investigator on half a dozen experiments in the Ion Cyclotron Resonance Facility. Collaborations with the MagLab’s Alan Marshall, Naresh Dalal, Paul Dunk and others yielded numerous publications on fullerenes, metal organic framework systems and other topics.

In a 2014 interview done for FSU’s Across the Spectrum magazine, Kroto cited his work at the MagLab and FSU as “some of the best work I’ve done.”

“Very beautiful,” said Kroto, “well up there intellectually with my previous work, so I am very happy with that.”

Kroto also devoted much of his life to educating and inspiring students and lay people across the globe about science.

Scientists have developed a way to isolate emulsion-causing petroleum compounds. The technique may help lower energy costs for both oil companies and consumers.

Trailblazer for Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance joins the ranks of Henry Ford, Thomas Edison.

This week at the lab, Patricia Medeiros is fishing for answers using one of the lab’s ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) magnets.

Medeiros (pictured above, standing at right, with her grad students), an assistant professor of marine organic geochemistry at the University of Georgia (UGA), arrived Monday morning with one colleague, two graduate students, dozens of water samples from estuaries around Georgia’s Sapelo Island, and lots of questions. The team will spend the week analyzing the molecular composition of the dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the water, using the ICR Facility’s 9.4 tesla passively shielded magnet.

In collaboration with UGA microbiologist Mary Ann Moran, Medeiros is studying what different communities of bacteria are doing with this DOM. They are particularly interested in how bacteria chemically transform carbon from the ocean, a key step in the marine carbon cycle that is still not well understood.

That knowledge could help us understand and better prepare for future changes in the climate, said Medeiros. "We don’t know too much about how microbes interact with DOM. We do know that DOM plays an important role in the global carbon cycle, however."


By Kristen Coyne.

A young chemist studying fracking fluid talks about what it's like when science hits close to home.

Used to perform complex chemical analysis, this magnet offers researchers the world's highest field for ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) mass spectrometry.

We have discovered biomarkers that make it possible to distinguish breast cancer cells from non-cancerous cells, based on identifying chemical modifications of histones, the molecules about which DNA strands are wound to keep them in the cell nucleus. The method uses a high-field magnet to spread out the signals from different parts of the histone, to locate the site(s) of chemical modifications.

State-of-the-art ion cyclotron resonance magnet system offers researchers significantly more power and accuracy than ever before.

Page 3 of 5