Nicolas Doiron-Leyraud of Canada's Université de Sherbrooke talks about his recent experiments on cuprate superconductors, why he chose physics over philosophy, and what makes the MagLab a great place to do science.

A new type of superconducting cable was successfully tested at high field at the MagLab, opening the door for the next generation of accelerator magnets operating at 20 teslas (T) and above.

Experiment marks first time an iron-based high-temperature superconductor works as a strong magnet.

One of the best tools for testing new materials for the next generation of research magnets is a MagLab magnet.

Reduced-size prototype coils for the 32 T all-superconducting magnet have been successfully tested. The results include the generation of 27 T, which is a record for superconducting magnets.

Los Alamos explores experimental path to potential 'next theory of superconductivity'

Are electrons stronger in pairs? MagLab physicists released new research published in Nature Communications that could help answer a looming question about the strength of Cooper pairs in high temperature superconducting materials.

A new record for a trapped field in a superconductor could herald the arrival of materials in a broad range of fields.

Scientists working at the MagLab have made a breakthrough in identifying the state from which high-Tc superconductivity emerges. Their results are in the June 19th issue of the journal Nature.

Josephson vortices were unexpectedly observed in the high-temperature iron superconductor SmFeAs(O,F), despite the material’s low electronic anisotropy. This development is important for the future deployment in high-Tc cable technology.

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