Scientists using MagLab magnets bolster theory that quantum fluctuations drive strange electronic phenomena.

Researchers investigating a strange material show how it could advance the development of next-generation transistors for the superfast electronics of tomorrow.

High magnetic fields reveal the electronic interactions underlying high-temperature superconductivity in the iron pnictides. This research unifies the superconducting phase diagram of the pnictides with those of other quantum critical, high-temperature superconductors, such at the cuprates.

MagLab scientists working with graphene — a stronger-than steel, but feathery light material with a myriad of intriguing attributes — have observed new properties that bring this high-tech super material closer to everyday use.

Comprehensive angle-resolved quantum oscillation measurements on YBa2Cu3O6+x in magnetic fields approaching 100 tesla are used to address longstanding problem of the normal state electronic of underdoped high temperature superconducting cuprates. The symmetry of the Fermi surface points uniquely to its reconstruction by biaxial ordering of the charge and bond degrees of freedom.

Researchers from Columbia University working at the MagLab have observed a physical phenomenon in bilayer graphene that could usher in a new generation of quantum computers.

A new record for a trapped field in a superconductor could herald the arrival of materials in a broad range of fields.

Using the high magnetic fields available at the NHMFL, users from MIT were able to observe a quantum spin hall (QSH) state in graphene. The QSH state results in two oppositely oriented spin currents flowing clockwise and counter clockwise around the edge of the graphene flake without dissipation effects. This discovery further advances the exciting work being done to bring about spin based electronics.

Utilizing the sensitivity of the NHMFL optics facility, a team of scientists from Georgia Tech, Sandia National Laboratories, Institut Néel, Université Paris-Sud and the NHMFL were able to observe collective oscillations of Dirac Fermions in graphene nanoribbons. The observed effect is tunable by varying the width of the graphene nanoribbons and the applied magnetic field. This observation raises the possibility of graphene based tunable THz devices.

MagLab scientist Tim Murphy will talk about extremely cold temperatures and why physicists into quantum mechanics really dig them.

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