Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, researchers observe how cocaine-like drug disrupts neural activity in rats.

Using an advanced technique, scientists discover that one of the most common substances in our everyday lives — glass — is more complex than we thought.

This instrument is located at the MagLab's AMRIS Facility at the University of Florida in Gainesville.

This instrument is located at the MagLab's AMRIS Facility at the University of Florida in Gainesville.

At 21.1 tesla, this is the strongest MRI scanner in the world for small animals. It is located in the MagLab's Tallahassee headquarters.

Ten years ago the 900 Ultra-Wide Bore magnet became available to an international user community for Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and Magnetic Resonance Imaging at the National High Magnetic Field Lab. Since then 69 publications have been published from this instrument spanning many disciplines and the number of publications per year continues to increase with 26 in just the past 18 months demonstrating that state of the art data continues to be collected on this superb magnet.

With the help of the world's strongest MRI machine, a scientist uses a novel technique to pinpoint ground zero for a migraine.

Biomedical researchers have a unique tool to investigate a variety of living and excised specimen with the MagLab’s 21.1 T 900-MHz ultra-widebore (105-mm) vertical magnet. However, there are challenges to performing research in a high-field vertical magnet, which have been addressed by a NHMFL-led team of international scientists working to make very high field or ultra high field MRI more flexible. This team has constructed a tunable sliding ring transmit/receive volume coil for 900-MHz hydrogen MRI that provides the uniformity and sensitivity for high resolution and functional imaging of living samples while accommodating unique excised samples to improve characterization and throughput. This new design incorporates the apparatus necessary for maintaining animals in a vertical position while providing remote tuning and sample flexibility beyond most available coils.

Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) coupled with solid state NMR can provide orders of magnitude enhancement to normally weak NMR signals, thereby enabling the study of inherently dilute proteins such as membrane proteins. Here we demonstrate a new approach to obtain DNP signal enhancements of membrane proteins by utilizing spin labeled lipids as the polarization agents. This strategy results in more than 2x in signal enhancements of a membrane protein when compared to standard DNP sample preparation techniques.

A new non-Brownian model of anomalous translational diffusion in nervous tissue is introduced and applied to the brain. This model provides new fractional order parameters of diffusion, entropy, waiting time and jump length that represent unique markers of morphology in neural tissue.

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