A unique way to bond together single-layer semiconductors opens a door to new nanotechnologies.

Eleven scientists recognized for their remarkable contributions to physics.

High B/T Facility Director

Sullivan holds undergraduate degrees from Otago University in New Zealand and received his Ph.D. at Harvard University in 1972, working on NMR studies at low temperatures with Robert Pound. He and his students in Paris discovered the quadrupolar glass phase of solid hydrogen and have studied the dynamics of vacancies and impurities in quantum solids, both helium and hydrogen.

A Fellow of the American Physical Society, and member of the Société Française de Physique, he was awarded the Prix Saintour by the Collège de France in 1978, and the La Caze Physics Prize by the Académie des Sciences (Paris) in 1983. He was a founding co-principal investigator for the National MagLab and a member of the Board of Governors of the Joint Oceanographic Institutions in 1999. He chaired the Physics Department at the University of Florida (UF) from 1989 to 1999, and under his watch the new physics building was planned and completed. He also served as Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences from 2000 to 2006, during which time he oversaw the creation of the Graham Center for Public Service, the Center for European Studies, the Paris Research Center, the Center for the Humanities, and initiated programs for new degrees in biology, women’s studies and gender research, and nine new languages at UF. He also oversaw the development of a UF partnership with Spain for the assembly and operation of the 10-meter telescope on the Canary Islands. Sullivan is currently Professor of Physics at UF.

Sullivan has authored more than 280 referred publications in his field, and was one of the founders of UF’s Microkelvin Laboratory in 1986 (with Dwight Adams and Gary Ihas). He is currently the editor of the Journal of Low Temperature Physics.

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Photo credit: Department of Physics, University of Florida

DC Field Facility Director

Murphy received his B.S. in physics in 1990 from Loras College and his M.S. in physics in 1993 from North Carolina State University. At NC State he studied under Prof. David Haase using ultra-low temperatures and magnetic fields to produce brute-force polarization of hydrogen nuclei for neutron scattering experiments at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory. His master’s thesis project was the design, construction and testing of a dilution refrigerator intended as a platform for bolometers used to detect cosmic rays.

Murphy came to the National MagLab in 1994 as a user support scientist in the Instrumentation & Operations Group, where he worked on developing ultra-low temperature instrumentation and sample environments for measurements in high magnetic fields. At the MagLab he switched from nuclear physics to the study of correlated electron materials in high fields. Murphy was named Millikelvin Facility Chief in 2008, interim DC Field Facility Director in 2012 and DC Field Facility Director in 2014.

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Photo credit: Stephen Bilenky

EMR Facility Director

Stephen Hill received his B.A. and D. Phil. degrees in physics from the University of Oxford in 1991 and 1994, respectively. From 1995 to 1997, he held a postdoctoral position at the National MagLab. He then took up faculty positions at Montana State University and the University of Florida before moving to Florida State University in 2008, where he is a professor of physics. Hill has more than 20 years of experience performing microwave and far-infrared magneto-optical spectroscopy in high magnetic fields, using a wide array of measurement techniques. His work has involved significant technique development. Current research interests include: fundamental studies of quantum phenomena in molecular magnets and correlated electron systems (quantum magnets and superconductors); and structure property relationships in a wide variety of polynuclear transition metal complexes.

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Photo credit: Stephen Bilenky

ICR Facility Director

Hendrickson received a bachelor's degree in chemistry in 1990 from the University of Northern Iowa. He received his Ph.D. in analytical chemistry in 1995 from The University of Texas at Austin under the direction of Prof. David A. Laude, Jr. Hendrickson then spent one year as a postdoctoral fellow at the National MagLab with Prof. Alan G. Marshall. In 1996 Hendrickson joined the MagLab staff and is currently director of the lab's Ion Cyclotron Resonance Facility, as well as a Distinguished University Scholar at Florida State University.

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Photo credit: Stephen Bilenky

Chief Scientist for Ion Cyclotron Resonance

Following his B.A. at Northwestern University (1965) and Ph.D. at Stanford University (1970), Alan Marshall spent 11 years at the University British Columbia and 13 years at Ohio State University. In 1993 he moved to Florida State University.

He co-invented and leads the continuing development of Fourier transform ICR mass spectrometry. His current research includes FT-ICR instrumentation development, complex mixture analysis (e.g., petroleum and its products), and mapping primary and higher-order structures of proteins.

He has published five books, seven patents and 620 refereed journal articles (more than 31,500 I.S.I. citations), and has presented more than 2,000 seminars/posters.

His recognitions include: fellow, American Academy of Arts & Sciences, American Physical Society, American Chemical Society, American Association for the Advancement of Science, Society for Applied Spectroscopy, and National Academy of Inventors; three American Chemical Society national awards; American Society for Mass Spectrometry Distinguished Contribution Award; and International Society for Mass Spectrometry Thomson Medal.

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Photo credit: Stephen Bilenky

Chief Scientist in Chemistry and Biology

Frydman studied at the University of Buenos Aires in Argentina, where he earned a bachelor’s of science in chemistry (1986) as well as a Ph.D. in physical chemistry (1990).

In addition to his work as the MagLab’s chief scientist in chemistry and biology, Frydman serves as professor and head at the Department of Chemical and Biological Physics at the Weizmann Institute of Sciences.

Frydman has earned numerous science accolades over the course of his career. These include: Tianjuan Wang Lecturer, Chinese Academy of Sciences (2014), Russell Varian Prize (2013), Sir Paul T. Callaghan Lecturer, ISMAR (2013), Outstanding Immigrant Scientist, State of Israel (2010), Advanced Grant Awardee, European Research Council (2010), Honorary Member, NMR Society of India (2010), Kimmel Award, Weizmann Institute (2009), Fellow, International Society of Magnetic Resonance (2008), Vaughan Lecturer, Rocky Mountains Conference (2006), Arthur D. Little Lecturer, MIT (2006), Sir Peter Mansfield Senior Visiting Fellow, University of Nottingham (2005), Israel Chemical Society Young Investigator Award (2005), Chemistry Awardee, Weizmann Institute Scientific Council (2004), Laukien Prize (2000), Alfred P. Sloan Fellow (1997), University of Illinois Scholar (1996), Beckman Young Investigator (1996), Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar (1996), CAREER Awardee, US NSF (1995), Camille and Henry Dreyfus New Faculty Awardee (1992) and Graduate Research Fellow, National Research Council of Argentina (1986).

In addition to science, Frydman’s interests include history, as well as hiking, running or biking in the company of family and friends.

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Photo credit: Stephen Bilenky

Associate Lab Director University of Florida Branch and Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy Facility Director

Long was an inaugural member of the Sturgis Fellows at the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, and received her bachelor’s degree in chemistry with minors in math, French, and microbiology in 1990. She received her Ph.D. in physical chemistry in 1997 from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where she held an NSF Pre-Doctoral Fellowship. Her thesis research, under the direction of Robert Griffin, utilized solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy at high magnetic fields to study the interplay between structure and dynamics in biological systems.

Long then spent three years as a postdoctoral researcher in the department of bioengineering at the University of Washington using NMR spectroscopy to study biomineralization. In 2000, she accepted a staff scientist position in the department of chemistry at the University of Washington, developing and supporting high-field NMR experiments. In 2002, she was recruited to the University of Florida (UF) to head her own research group.

In 2009, Long became director of the MagLab's AMRIS Facility, with primary responsibility for its science and technology portfolio in high-field MRI and NMR spectroscopy. Long is also a professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at UF, where her research group uses NMR spectroscopy to study the molecular underpinnings of biofilm formation, pulmonary surfactant properties, and dynamic nuclear polarization.

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Photo credit: Stephen Bilenky

Chief Materials Scientist

In addition to his role as chief materials scientist, David Larbalestier is the Krafft Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering.

Larbalestier has been active in superconductivity ever since his Ph.D., when his thesis work gained the Matthey Prize of Imperial College London. At the Superconducting Magnet Research Group of the Rutherford Laboratory, he worked for four years on the development of multifilamentary Nb3Sn conductors and magnets. This work culminated in the first filamentary Nb3Sn magnets, one outcome of which was the first filamentary Nb3Sn NMR magnet (470 MHz), for which he shared a 1978 IR-100 award with an Oxford Instrument Company team.

In 1976 Larbalestier joined the University of Wisconsin in Madison, where he taught in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering and the Department of Physics, and held both the L. V. Shubnikov Chair and the David Grainger Chair of Superconductivity. His group has had a large influence on the understanding and application of both low- and high-temperature superconductors, and made the definitive studies of the materials science and processing of the most widely used superconductor, niobium titanium.

Larbalestier has been active in promoting collaborations uniting industry, national laboratory and other university groups. His leadership in both the low-temperature and high-temperature materials superconductor communities has led to prizes from the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and the Council for Chemical Research for his work and that of his collaborators on (Bi,Pb)2Sr2Ca2Cu3O10-x.

He has served on many review panels of the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Department of Energy (DOE), was a member of the 1987 National Academy of Sciences Panel on High Temperature Superconductivity, and led the 1996 World Technology Evaluation Center Panel on Energy Applications of Superconductors sponsored by DOE and NSF.

In 2000 he was a visiting professor at the University of Geneva and a visiting fellow at Imperial College London. In 2007 he was given the Lifetime Achievement Award of the International Cryogenic Materials Conference, and in 2009-2010 was the Distinguished Lecturer of the IEEE Council on Superconductivity. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society, the National Academy of Engineering, the Institute of Physics (UK), the National Academy of Inventors, the IEEE, the Materials Research Society and the AAAS.

Larbalestier is presently a member of U.S. Department of Energy’s High Energy Physics Advisory Panel and the National Materials and Manufacturing Board of the National Research Council. His work has been supported by several arms of the DOE, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, the National Science Foundation, ITER, CERN and numerous U.S. national laboratories. His 490 publications have received more than 17,000 citations.

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Email: David Larbalestier

Photo credit: Stephen Bilenky

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