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A unique way to bond together single-layer semiconductors opens a door to new nanotechnologies.

Eleven scientists recognized for their remarkable contributions to physics.

High B/T Facility Director

Sullivan holds undergraduate degrees from Otago University in New Zealand and received his Ph.D. at Harvard University in 1972, working on NMR studies at low temperatures with Robert Pound. He and his students in Paris discovered the quadrupolar glass phase of solid hydrogen and have studied the dynamics of vacancies and impurities in quantum solids, both helium and hydrogen.

A Fellow of the American Physical Society, and member of the Société Française de Physique, he was awarded the Prix Saintour by the Collège de France in 1978, and the La Caze Physics Prize by the Académie des Sciences (Paris) in 1983. He was a founding co-principal investigator for the National MagLab and a member of the Board of Governors of the Joint Oceanographic Institutions in 1999. He chaired the Physics Department at the University of Florida (UF) from 1989 to 1999, and under his watch the new physics building was planned and completed. He also served as Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences from 2000 to 2006, during which time he oversaw the creation of the Graham Center for Public Service, the Center for European Studies, the Paris Research Center, the Center for the Humanities, and initiated programs for new degrees in biology, women’s studies and gender research, and nine new languages at UF. He also oversaw the development of a UF partnership with Spain for the assembly and operation of the 10-meter telescope on the Canary Islands. Sullivan is currently Professor of Physics at UF.

Sullivan has authored more than 280 referred publications in his field, and was one of the founders of UF’s Microkelvin Laboratory in 1986 (with Dwight Adams and Gary Ihas). He is currently the editor of the Journal of Low Temperature Physics.

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Photo credit: Department of Physics, University of Florida

DC Field Facility Director

Murphy received his B.S. in physics in 1990 from Loras College and his M.S. in physics in 1993 from North Carolina State University. At NC State he studied under Prof. David Haase using ultra-low temperatures and magnetic fields to produce brute-force polarization of hydrogen nuclei for neutron scattering experiments at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory. His master’s thesis project was the design, construction and testing of a dilution refrigerator intended as a platform for bolometers used to detect cosmic rays.

Murphy came to the National MagLab in 1994 as a user support scientist in the Instrumentation & Operations Group, where he worked on developing ultra-low temperature instrumentation and sample environments for measurements in high magnetic fields. At the MagLab he switched from nuclear physics to the study of correlated electron materials in high fields. Murphy was named Millikelvin Facility Chief in 2008, interim DC Field Facility Director in 2012 and DC Field Facility Director in 2014.

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Photo credit: Stephen Bilenky

EMR Facility Director

Stephen Hill received his B.A. and D. Phil. degrees in physics from the University of Oxford in 1991 and 1994, respectively. From 1995 to 1997, he held a postdoctoral position at the National MagLab. He then took up faculty positions at Montana State University and the University of Florida before moving to Florida State University in 2008, where he is a professor of physics. Hill has more than 20 years of experience performing microwave and far-infrared magneto-optical spectroscopy in high magnetic fields, using a wide array of measurement techniques. His work has involved significant technique development. Current research interests include: fundamental studies of quantum phenomena in molecular magnets and correlated electron systems (quantum magnets and superconductors); and structure property relationships in a wide variety of polynuclear transition metal complexes.

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Photo credit: Stephen Bilenky

ICR Facility Director

Hendrickson received a bachelor's degree in chemistry in 1990 from the University of Northern Iowa. He received his Ph.D. in analytical chemistry in 1995 from The University of Texas at Austin under the direction of Prof. David A. Laude, Jr. Hendrickson then spent one year as a postdoctoral fellow at the National MagLab with Prof. Alan G. Marshall. In 1996 Hendrickson joined the MagLab staff and is currently director of the lab's Ion Cyclotron Resonance Facility, as well as a Distinguished University Scholar at Florida State University.

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Photo credit: Stephen Bilenky

NMR Facility Director

In 1976 Cross received a B.S. degree from Trinity College in Hartford, Conn., and later a Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of Pennsylvania with Prof. Stanley J. Opella pursuing technological development for structural and dynamic characterizations of protein through solid state NMR spectroscopy. Cross spent 1983 at the University of Basel’s Biozentrum in Switzerland with Prof. Joachim Seelig. While Cross’s NATO fellowship was to pursue this lipid research with Seelig, he spent much of the year developing MRI probes for one of the first MRI instruments for human extremities and laboratory animals.

In 1984 at Florida State University’s Department of Chemistry, Cross pursued the use of solid state NMR of transmembrane peptides and proteins. Having received a Presidential Young Investigator Award from NSF, he characterized the structure of gramicidin A in a liquid crystalline lipid environment, the first all-atom structure of a membrane peptide or protein in a lipid environment. Along the way he became an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow and in 1989. Cross was recruited by Prof. Jack Crow to write portions of the successful grant proposal to the National Science Foundation for moving the National MagLab from MIT to Tallahassee.

Cross is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and of the Biophysical Society as well as the International Society for Magnetic Resonance.

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Photo credit: Stephen Bilenky

Chief Scientist for Ion Cyclotron Resonance

Following his B.A. at Northwestern University (1965) and Ph.D. at Stanford University (1970), Alan Marshall spent 11 years at the University British Columbia and 13 years at Ohio State University. In 1993 he moved to Florida State University.

He co-invented and leads the continuing development of Fourier transform ICR mass spectrometry. His current research includes FT-ICR instrumentation development, complex mixture analysis (e.g., petroleum and its products), and mapping primary and higher-order structures of proteins.

He has published five books, seven patents and 620 refereed journal articles (more than 31,500 I.S.I. citations), and has presented more than 2,000 seminars/posters.

His recognitions include: fellow, American Academy of Arts & Sciences, American Physical Society, American Chemical Society, American Association for the Advancement of Science, Society for Applied Spectroscopy, and National Academy of Inventors; three American Chemical Society national awards; American Society for Mass Spectrometry Distinguished Contribution Award; and International Society for Mass Spectrometry Thomson Medal.

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Photo credit: Stephen Bilenky

Chief Scientist in Chemistry and Biology

Frydman studied at the University of Buenos Aires in Argentina, where he earned a bachelor’s of science in chemistry (1986) as well as a Ph.D. in physical chemistry (1990).

In addition to his work as the MagLab’s chief scientist in chemistry and biology, Frydman serves as professor and head at the Department of Chemical and Biological Physics at the Weizmann Institute of Sciences.

Frydman has earned numerous science accolades over the course of his career. These include: Tianjuan Wang Lecturer, Chinese Academy of Sciences (2014), Russell Varian Prize (2013), Sir Paul T. Callaghan Lecturer, ISMAR (2013), Outstanding Immigrant Scientist, State of Israel (2010), Advanced Grant Awardee, European Research Council (2010), Honorary Member, NMR Society of India (2010), Kimmel Award, Weizmann Institute (2009), Fellow, International Society of Magnetic Resonance (2008), Vaughan Lecturer, Rocky Mountains Conference (2006), Arthur D. Little Lecturer, MIT (2006), Sir Peter Mansfield Senior Visiting Fellow, University of Nottingham (2005), Israel Chemical Society Young Investigator Award (2005), Chemistry Awardee, Weizmann Institute Scientific Council (2004), Laukien Prize (2000), Alfred P. Sloan Fellow (1997), University of Illinois Scholar (1996), Beckman Young Investigator (1996), Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar (1996), CAREER Awardee, US NSF (1995), Camille and Henry Dreyfus New Faculty Awardee (1992) and Graduate Research Fellow, National Research Council of Argentina (1986).

In addition to science, Frydman’s interests include history, as well as hiking, running or biking in the company of family and friends.

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Photo credit: Stephen Bilenky

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