Convergence Research at High Magnetic Fields

A scientific symposium and festschrift celebration to honor Greg Boebinger and his contributions to convergence research in high magnetic fields in celebration of his 60th birthday. To be held in Tallahassee, FL, on January 9 and 10, 2020.

  • Overview

    Greg Boebinger

    Greg Boebinger

    This special scientific symposium will honor Boebinger's impressive body of work, from studying the fractional quantum Hall effect with Nobel Laureates Horst Stormer, Dan Tsui and Robert Laughlin to his research on topological materials and correlated electron systems, including high-temperature superconductors. Directing the National MagLab since 2004, Boebinger's scientific significance spans across multiple disciplines to advance discovery and innovation in materials research, physics, magnet engineering, chemistry, biology and the social sciences.

    Confirmed Speakers

     
    • Gabe Aeppli, ETH, Zurich
    • Yoichi Ando, U of Koln
    • Paula Giraldo-Gallo, University of the Andes
    • Eric Isaacs, Carnegie Institute
    • Steven Kivelson, Stanford
    • Bob Laughlin, Stanford
    • Chun Ning (Jeanie) Lau, The Ohio State University
    • Peter Littlewood, U Chicago
    • Andy Mackenzie, Max Planck Institute, Dresden
    • Albert Migliori, Los Alamos National Lab
    • Art Ramirez, UC Santa Cruz
    • Myriam Sarachik , City College of New York
    • Vivien Zapf, Los Alamos National Lab
     

    The scientific program will be coupled with a festschrift celebration in honor of Greg's 60th birthday featuring a special performance by world-renowned pianist, Ian Hobson and a banquet dinner.

     
    •  
      Ian Hobson
      Photo Credit: Hyeyeon Jung
    •  

      Ian Hobson

      Pianist and Conductor

      Pianist and conductor Ian Hobson—called "powerful and persuasive" by The New York Times— is recognized internationally for his command of an extraordinarily comprehensive repertoire, his consummate performances of the Romantic masters, his deft and idiomatic readings of neglected piano music old and new, and his assured conducting from both the piano and the podium.

      pdfFull bio

     
  • Speaker Bios

     
    • Professor Gabriel Aeppli
    • Professor Gabriel Aeppli

      Professor of physics at ETH Zürich and EPF Lausanne and Head of the Photon Science division of the Paul Scherrer Institute

    Gabriel Aeppli is professor of physics at ETH Zürich and EPF Lausanne, and head of the Photon Science division of the Paul Scherrer Institute. All of his degrees are from MIT and include a BSc in Mathematics and Electrical Engineering, and MSc and PhD in Electrical Engineering. He started his career as a work-study student at IBM and after his PhD moved to Bell Laboratories and then NEC, and worked on problems ranging from liquid crystals to magnetic data storage. He was subsequently co-founder and director of the London Centre for Nanotechnology and Quain Professor at University College London. Aeppli also cofounded the Bio-Nano Consulting Company, of which he remains a non-executive director. He is a frequent advisor to numerous entities worldwide engaged in the funding, evaluation and management of science and technology. Honors include the Mott Prize of the Institute of Physics (London), the Oliver Buckley prize of the American Physical Society, the Néel Medal/International Magnetism Prize of the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics, election to the US Academy of Arts and Sciences, the US National Academy of Sciences and the Royal Society.


    • Dr. Yoichi Ando
    • Dr. Yoichi Ando

      Spokesperson of the German Cluster of Excellence "Matter and Light for Quantum Computing (ML4Q)"

    Dr. Yoichi Ando was born in Tokyo, Japan, in 1964. He obtained B.Sc. (1987), M.Sc. (1989), and Ph.D. (1994) degrees from the University of Tokyo. He was a postdoc at Bell Labs supervised by Greg Boebinger (1994-1996), and then led a research group at Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry in Tokyo (1996-2007), where he eventually became a department head. He was appointed to a full professor in 2007 at Osaka University, and in 2015 he moved to the University of Cologne to assume a chair for experimental physics. Since 2019, he is the spokesperson of the German Cluster of Excellence “Matter and Light for Quantum Computing (ML4Q)”. According to the Web of Science, his h-index is currently 70. For his seminal contributions to the fields of high-temperature superconductivity and topological materials, he received Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) Prize in 2006, Inoue Prize for Science in 2014, and Osaka Science Prize in 2014. He is one of the Highly Cited Researchers in Physics (2014, 2017, and 2019) and he obtained the prestigious ERC Advanced Grant in 2017 for his research on Majorana fermions.


    • Assistant Professor Paula Giraldo Gallo
    • Assistant Professor Paula Giraldo Gallo

      Universidad de Los Andes, Bogotá, Colombia

    Paula received her bachelor in physics degree in 2006, and master in physics degree in 2009, both from Universidad de Los Andes, Bogotá, Colombia. She received her PhD degree from Stanford University in 2015, working in Ian Fisher’s lab. She joined the group of Greg Boebinger in 2015 as a Jack Crow Postdoctoral Fellow, and in 2017 returned to Universidad de Los Andes as Visiting Professor in the Physics Department. She is an Assistant Professor in the same Department since January 2019, leading the Quantum Materials Lab. Her current research interests are related to superconductivity in low-dimensional charge ordered compounds. She recently received the L’oreal-Unesco For Women in Science Award – Colombia (2018), and the Lee Osheroff Richardson Science Prize (2019), as well as the prize to be the mother of a great two-year old girl.


    • Eric D. Issacs
    • Dr. Eric D. Issacs

      Condensed Matter Physicist
      11th President of the Carnegie Institution for Science

    Eric D. Isaacs is a condensed matter physicist and the 11th president of the Carnegie Institution for Science, a private, nonprofit research organization headquartered in Washington, D.C. As president of Carnegie Science, Dr. Isaacs leads the Institution’s investigators in forefront research in plant biology, developmental biology, Earth and planetary sciences, astronomy, and global ecology.

    Dr. Isaacs came to Carnegie from the University of Chicago, where he served as the Robert A. Millikan Distinguished Service Professor in Physics and Executive Vice President for Research,Innovation and National Laboratories. In that role, he provided direct oversight of Argonne National Laboratory and Fermilab for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science. He also led the University’s founding-partner relationship with the Giant Magellan Telescope project. He previously served as Provost of the University of Chicago.

    Dr. Isaacs spent five years as Director of Argonne, one of the nation's largest science and engineering research centers. As Argonne’s Director, Dr. Isaacs earned a reputation as a nationally recognized institutional strategist and advocate for scientific research and its importance in driving the U.S. economy. He joined the University and Argonne in 2003 as the founding director of the Center for Nanoscale Materials, where researchers study and create materials at the atomic and molecular scales.

    He began his career as a postdoctoral fellow at Bell Laboratories, where he went on to serve as director of the semiconductor physics research and materials physics research departments.

    Dr. Isaacs holds a Ph.D. in physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a bachelor's degree from Beloit College. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society and of the National Academy of Inventors. He has authored or co-authored more than 100 scholarly publications.


    • Professor Steven Kivelson

      Professor of Physics
      Stanford University

    Steven Kivelson is the Prabhu Goel Family Professor of Physics at Stanford University. He was a post doctoral fellow working with Bob Schrieffer, first at the University of Pennsylvania and then at the ITP (as it was then called) at UCSB. He was on the faculty in Physics at SUNY at Stony Brook and at UCLA before moving to Stanford in 2004. While he was on the faculty at Stony Brook, he tried to hire Greg Boebinger to be a colleague, but Greg decided to accept a position at Bell Labs, instead.


    • Professor Chun Ning (Jeanie) Lau
    • Professor Chun Ning (Jeanie) Lau

      Professor in the Department of Physics
      The Ohio State University

    Chun Ning (Jeanie) Lau is a Professor in the Department of Physics at The Ohio State University. She received her BA in physics from University of Chicago in 1994, and PhD in physics from Harvard in 2001. She was a research associate at Hewlett Packard Labs in Palo Alto from 2002 to 2004, before joining University of California, Riverside in 2004 as an assistant professor. She was promoted to associate professor in 2009 and full professor in 2012. Starting January 2017 she moved to The Ohio State University. The honors and awards she has received include the NSF CAREER award, the PECASE award and APS Fellow. Her research focuses on electronic, thermal and mechanical properties of nanoscale systems, in particular, graphene and other two-dimensional systems.


    • Professor Robert Betts Laughlin

      The Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor of Physics and Applied Physics at Stanford University

    Robert Betts Laughlin is the Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor of Physics and Applied Physics at Stanford University. Along with Horst L. Störmer of Columbia University and Daniel C. Tsui of Princeton University, he was awarded the 1998 Nobel Prize in physics for their explanation of the fractional quantum Hall effect. In 1983, Laughlin was first to provide a many body wave function, now known as the Laughlin wavefunction, for the fractional quantum hall effect, which was able to correctly explain the fractionalized charge observed in experiments. This state has since been interpreted as the integer quantum Hall effect of the composite fermion. His other Awards include the E.O Lawrence Award for Physics, The Oliver E. Buckley Prize, the Benjamin Franklin Medal for Physics, and the Onsager Medal; and he is a member of the National Academy of Sciences.


    • Professoe Peter B Littlewood
    • Professor Peter B Littlewood

      Professor of Physics
      University of Chicago 

    Peter B Littlewood is a Professor of Physics at the University of Chicago, who was previously Director of Argonne National Laboratory, and before that a Professor of Physics at the University of Cambridge and Head of the Cavendish Laboratory. He is the Founding Executive Chair of the Faraday Institution, UK’s independent centre for electrochemical energy storage science and technology, supporting research, training, and analysis. He began his career with almost 20 years at Bell Laboratories, ultimately serving for five years as head of Theoretical Physics Research.

    His research interests include superconductivity and superfluids, strongly correlated electronic materials, collective dynamics of glasses, density waves in solids, neuroscience, and applications of materials for energy and sustainability. He is a fellow of the Royal Society of London, the Institute of Physics, the American Physical Society, and TWAS (The World Academy of Sciences). He serves on advisory boards of research and education institutions and other scientific organizations worldwide. He holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Natural Sciences (Physics) and a Doctorate in Physics, both from the University of Cambridge.


    • Professor Andy P. Mackenzie
    • Professor Andy P. Mackenzie

      Director, Physics of Quantum Materials Department, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids

    Andy Mackenzie is Director of the Physics of Quantum Materials department at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Dresden, Germany and Professor of Condensed Matter Physics at the University of St Andrews, Scotland. His research interests centre on the study of metals and superconductors, concentrating on systems that can be grown with extremely high levels of purity, and sculpted into well-controlled microstructures using focused ion beam techniques. He has been awarded Fellowship of the Royal Society of London (2015), Royal Society of Edinburgh (2004), American Physical Society (2011)and UK Institute of Physics (2004), and a recipient of the Daiwa Adrian Prize (2004) and the Mott Medal and Prize (2011).


    • Dr. Albert Migliori
    • Dr. Albert Migliori

      Los Alamos guest scientist
      CTO of Alamo Creek Engineering

    Albert Migliori received his B. S. in physics in 1968 from Carnegie Mellon University. He went on to receive his M. S. in 1970, and Ph.D. in physics from the University of Illinois in 1973. Also in 1973 he joined the Los Alamos National Laboratory as a Director's Postdoctoral Appointee. He won a DOE energy related postdoc in 1975, and in 1976 became a staff member at LANL. At LANL, major topics of interest included design of liquid-working-fluid heat engines, discovery of acoustic heat engines, the development of resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS), the development of precision digital signal processing hardware for pulsed magnetic fields and RUS.

    He is co-discoverer of acoustic heat engines and is the leading expert in the use of resonant ultrasound spectroscopy as a solid-state physics tool. He has been director of the Seaborg Institute for Transuranic Science, Chair of the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory Science Advisory Council, He is a fellow of the Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Acoustical Society of America, the AAAS and the American Physical Society. He holds 24 patents, is the author of over 200 publications, six book chapters, and one book. He is now a Los Alamos guest scientist, and CTO of Alamo Creek Engineering, an instrument maker producing RUS systems.


    • Professor Arthur P. Ramirez
    • Professor Arthur P. Ramirez

      Professor of physics, Physics Department, UC Santa Cruz

    Art Ramirez joined Bell Labs in 1984 after completing his Ph.D. at Yale on spin solitons in a 1D ferromagnet. At Bell he studied a variety of topics including heavy fermions, cuprate and C60 superconductivity, geometrical frustration, colossal magnetoresistance, and organic electronics. After a stint at Los Alamos, he returned to Bell in 2003. He entered academia in 2009 at UC Santa Cruz as dean of engineering and is now professor of physics.


    • Myriam P. Sarachik
    • Professor Myriam P. Sarachik

      2020 APS Medal for Exceptional Achievement in Research

    Born in Antwerp, Belgium, Myriam Sarachik attended primary school in Antwerp and Havana, Cuba and high school at the Bronx High School of Science in New York. She earned a A. B. cum laude from Barnard College in 1954, and a M.S in 1957 and Ph. D. in 1960 in physics from Columbia University.

    Following a year as a research associate at IBM Watson Laboratories at Columbia University, she worked as a Member of the Technical Staff at Bell Telephone Laboratories at Murray Hill, New Jersey for two years. In September 1964 she was appointed assistant professor at the City College of the City University of New York, was promoted to associate professor in 1967, and to the rank of professor in 1971; she was designated a Distinguished Professor in 1995 and retired in August 2018. Sarachik has published extensively in professional journals on her work in superconductivity, disordered metallic alloys, metal-insulator transitions in doped semiconductors, hopping transport in solids, properties of strongly interacting electrons in two dimensions, and spin dynamics in molecular magnets. She served as President of the American Physical Society in 2003. She received the 1995 New York City Mayor's Award for Excellence in Science and Technology, a 2004 Sloan Public Service Award from the Fund for the City of New York, the 2005 Oliver E. Buckley Prize in Condensed Matter Physics, and was named the for women in science L'Oreal/UNESCO laureate for North America in 2005.

    She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, and a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Physical Society, the New York Academy of Sciences, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She was awarded a Doctor of Science honoris causa by Amherst College in 2006. This year, she will be awarded the 2020 APS Medal for Exceptional Achievement in Research.


    • Vivien Zapf
    • Dr. Vivien Zapf

      Pulsed Field Facility, Los Alamos

    Vivien Zapf joined the magnet lab at Los Alamos in 2004 as a director's funded post-doc just as Greg Boebinger left Los Alamos to become the magnet lab director in Florida. She is almost certain those two events aren't related. She was first attracted to condensed matter physics by the intrigue of superconductivity. She performed an undergraduate project in superconductivity and summer internship at Argonne studying high temperature superconductivity. She received her Ph.D. at UCSD studying unconventional superconductivity in heavy fermion materials. She went on to become post-doc at Caltech to study high temperature superconductivity. Finally she joined the magnet lab and for no particular reason stopped studying superconductivity. But she still greatly enjoys learning about superconductivity. She currently investigates quantum magnetism, magnetoelectric coupling, and multiferroic behavior in inorganic and metal-organic complexes. She manages a menagerie of two children, two cats, and a dog and in her non-existent spare time enjoys singing, though not about superconductivity. (Yet).

     
  • Important Dates

     
    November 18, 2019 Online registration closes
    November 18, 2019 Bio and picture submission (Speakers only)
    November 18, 2019 Submission of abstract and title of presentation (Speakers only)
    December 1, 2019 Discounted hotel reservation rate ends
    Still open Memory submission ends
  • Program

     

    Thursday, January 9th, 2020

    Reception at FSU Beth Moor Alumni Lounge in Longmire Building 6pm
    Piano Recital by Ian Hobson at FSU's Opperman Music Hall. 8pm

    Friday, January 10th, 2020

    Series of 15 minute talks plus 5 minutes questions in Turnbull Florida State Conference Center (room 108)

      BREAKFAST at the hotel
    08:00 AM Bus departs from Hampton Inn & Suites to Turnbull Conference Center
    08:30 AM Registration
    08:45 AM Festschrift Opening Remarks - President John Thrasher
    08:50 AM Bob Laughlin, Stanford
    09:10 AM pdfCarnegie, Terrestrial Magnetism, and Exoplanetary Habitability - Eric Isaacs, Carnegie Institute
    09:30 AM pdfTopological superconductivity and Majorana fermions - Yoichi Ando, U of Koln
    09:50 AM BREAK
    10:20 AM pdfTopological excitations in molecular and van der Waals ferromagnets - Gabe Aeppli, ETH, Zurich
    10:40 AM pdfThe Metal-Insulator Transition (MIT) in two dimensions: Yet Another Surprise - Myriam Sarachik , City College of New York
    11:00 AM Art Ramirez, UC Santa Cruz
    11:20 AM LUNCH
    12:50 PM pdfFire and explosions -Los Alamos is so exciting - Albert Migliori, Los Alamos National Lab
    1:10 PM pdfThe role of high magnetic fields in understanding magnetoelectric coupling - Vivien Zapf, Los Alamos National Lab
    1:30 PM pdfFlat Bands in Flatland - Chun Ning (Jeanie) Lau, The Ohio State University
    1:50 PM BREAK
    2:20 PM pdfUnprecedented electrical conductivity in the delafossite layered metals - Andy Mackenzie, Max Planck Institute, Dresden
    2:40 PM pdfElectronic nematic softening in cuprate superconductors probed by resonant ultrasound spectroscopy measurements - Paula Giraldo-Gallo, University of the Andes
    3:00 PM pdfConcerning the significance of the quantum oscillations in the cuprate - Steven Kivelson, Stanford
    3:20 PM Closing Remarks - Greg Boebinger
    3:40 PM Adjourn
     
    Banquet Dinner in Turnbull Florida State Conference Center (room 108) 6pm
     

    This event is by invitation-only.

     
  • Parking and Bus Schedule

    Parking

    Day 1 – January 9, 2020

    Free parking for the Reception at FSU Beth Moor Alumni Lounge and Piano Recital at FSU's Opperman Music Hall will be available on a first come, first serve basis on parking lots Hecht House (lot#219) and Housewright Music (lot#213) from 4:30pm-8:00pm on Thursday. Meter parking will be available at Call Street. View FSU map

    FSU map

    Day 2 – January 10, 2020

    Visitor parking for the Festschrift Symposium and Banquet at Turnbull Florida State Conference Center will be available on a first come, first serve basis on ALL LEVEL(s) of the St. Augustine Parking Garage located adjacent to the Conference Center from 8:00 a.m.-10:00 p.m. The direct entrance to the Conference Center is located on the fourth floor of the parking garage. After the reserved time, any vehicles parking in the garage must have an FSU permit or may be subject to ticketing.

     

    Bus schedule for guests lodging at Hampton Inn & Suites

    Bus shuttle will be provided to guests lodging at the Hampton Inn & Suites. All other event attendees are encouraged to utilize parking as described above.

     

    Day 1 – January 9, 2020

    5:15pm Bus departs from Hampton Inn & Suites, 824 Railroad Avenue to Beth Moor Alumni Lounge, 125 Convocation Way
    7:00pm Bus departs from Hampton Inn & Suites, 824 Railroad Avenue to Opperman Music Hall, 114 N. Copeland Street
    7:30pm Bus departs from Beth Moor Alumni Lounge, 125 Convocation Way to Hampton Inn & Suites, 824 Railroad Avenue
    9:30pm Bus departs from Opperman Music Hall, 114 N. Copeland Street to Hampton Inn & Suites, 824 Railroad Avenue

    Day 2 – January 10, 2020

    8:00am Bus departs from Hampton Inn & Suites, 824 Railroad Avenue to Turnbull Conference Center, 555 W Pensacola St
    3:45pm Bus departs from Turnbull Conference Center, 555 W Pensacola St to Hampton Inn & Suites, 824 Railroad Avenue
    5:30pm Bus departs from Hampton Inn & Suites, 824 Railroad Avenue to Turnbull Conference Center, 555 W Pensacola St
    8:00pm Bus departs from Turnbull Conference Center, 555 W Pensacola St to Hampton Inn & Suites, 824 Railroad Avenue
     
  • Submit a memory

     

    Do you have a memory with Greg that you would like to share? Please submit your memories to be included in a special memory book that will be created to commemorate this event.

    The submissions will be kept private and only one finished book will be created, so feel free to share your most personal memories, stories, or jokes that Greg will treasure for years to come.

    If you would prefer, you may email your submission to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Please keep in mind if your email attachments are larger than 10 Mb, the form submission is a better way to transfer large files.

     
  • Give To The Festschrift

     

    If you would like to support the event, please contribute online at https://one.fsu.edu/foundation/donate/give-online. Select the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory Fund (F06536) from the dropdown list of designations or send a check made out to FSU Foundation to Whitney Brown at 1800 E Paul Dirac Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32310. Please add F06536 to the memo line.

    If you contribute, we will include your name in our list of sponsors on the website and in the printed programs.

     
  • Hotel and Travel

     

    Hotel

    Hampton Inn & Suites 824 Railroad Avenue. Booking Link

    Reservations should be made by December 1.

    The room rate is $149 per night.


    Lodging

    Suggested local hotels minutes away from FSU:

    Residence Inn
    600 W Gaines St
    P: (850) 329-9080
    Four Points by Sheraton - Tallahassee Downtown
    316 W Tennessee St.
    P: (850) 422-0071
    DoubleTree by Hilton
    101 S Adams St.
    P: (850) 224-5000

    Airport

    Tallahassee International Airport (TLH)
    3300 Capital Cir SW

    Car Rentals

    Enterprise
    Tallahassee International Airport
    P: (850) 575-0603
    National
    Tallahassee International Airport
    P: (844) 370-9184
     
  • Code of Conduct

     

    All participants, attendees, vendors, staff, volunteers, and all other stakeholders are required to conduct themselves in a professional manner that is welcoming to all participants and free from any form of discrimination, harassment, or retaliation. Participants will treat each other with respect and consideration to create a collegial, inclusive, and professional environment. The MagLab is funded by the National Science Foundation and State of Florida and operated by Florida State University, the University of Florida, and Los Alamos National Laboratory. The Florida State University is An Equal Opportunity/Access/Affirmative Action/Pro Disabled & Veteran Employer. View FSU's Equal Opportunity Statement.

    If there are any concerns or issues that needs to be addressed, please reach out to any of the organizers.

     
  • Visa Information

     

    Please refer to Visa Information page for more information.

     
  • Organizing Committee

     

    Organizing Committee

    Conference Coordinator

     

    For more information please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

     
  • Sponsors

     

    We appreciate these individuals and organizations who have offered financial support to make this event possible:

    • Laura Greene
    • David Larbalestier
    • Mark Meisel
    • Charles Mielke
    • Doan Nguyen
    • FSU College of Arts and Sciences
    • FSU Office of the President
    • Los Alamos National Laboratory
    • University of Florida
     
    • Florida State University logo
    • National Science Foundation logo
    • Institute for Complex Adaptive Matter logo
    • University of Florida logo
    • Los Alamos National Laboratory logo
     

    If you would like to contribute to the event, please visit https://one.fsu.edu/foundation/donate/give-online and select the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory Fund (F06536) or send a check made out to FSU Foundation to Whitney Brown at 1800 E Paul Dirac Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32310. Please add F06536 to the memo line.

     
Last modified on 29 January 2020