20 August 2021

Testing REBCO Critical Current Using a Superconducting Transformer

Left: E-I curves of the CORC cable at various magnetic fields. Right: Critical current versus magnetic field. The dash line is a fit to the critical current: Ic~B-0.52. Left: E-I curves of the CORC cable at various magnetic fields. Right: Critical current versus magnetic field. The dash line is a fit to the critical current: Ic~B-0.52.

A new device enables the testing of superconducting cables to high current without the high helium consumption associated with traditional current leads. This superconducting transformer will play an important role in testing cables needed for next-generation superconducting magnets.

What did scientists discover?

A superconducting transformer has been co-developed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the MagLab [1],[2]. The superconducting transformer is used in the present research as an efficient high current source for measuring very high critical currents of a high-temperature superconducting REBCO cable in high magnetic fields. 

FACILITY USED

This research was conducted in the Division of Magnet Science and Technology.

Why is this important?

This unique set of data obtained in high magnetic fields and at high electrical current (Figure a, b) characterize the critical current of the sample at liquid helium temperature as a function of magnetic field. This measurement is critical for the development of new state-of-the-art superconducting cables. Funded by the MagLab User Collaboration Grant Program, this research studies a REBCO Conductor-On-Round-Core (CORC) cable which was developed and manufactured by Advanced Conductor Technologies LLC (ACT), a long-time user and collaborator of the MagLab.

Who did the research?

Hui Yu1, Jun Lu1, Jeremy Weiss2, and Danko van der Laan2

1National High Magnetic Field Laboratory; 2Advanced Conductor Technologies LLC

Why did the MagLab need to do this research?

This work requires a sophisticated scientific facility, a large 12T split-solenoid superconducting magnet and a superconducting transformer that provides electrical current up to 45 kiloamperes. There are very few laboratories in the world able to provide such a facility. This work demonstrates the critical role the MagLab plays in testing high temperature superconducting cables in magnetic fields, a crucial experiment during the development of such cables, and eventually, necessary to realize high-temperature superconducting magnets constructed from those cables.

Details for scientists

Funding

This research was funded by the following grants: G.S. Boebinger (NSF DMR-1157490 and 1644779)


For more information, contact Mark Bird.

Details

  • Research Area: Magnet Technology, Superconductivity - Applied
  • Research Initiatives: Materials
  • Facility / Program: MS&T
  • Year: 2021
Last modified on 20 August 2021