Superconductors conduct large amounts of electricity without losses. They are also used to create very large magnetic fields, for example in MRI machines, to study materials and medicine. Here, researchers developed a fast, new "smart" technique to measure how much current a superconductor can carry using very high pulsed magnetic fields.

Tests of the first Integrated Coil Form test coil wound using REBCO superconducting tape show promise for use in ultra powerful magnets of the future.

Tests of high-temperature superconducting REBCO tapes at 4.2 K showed resistance to cyclic loading, demonstrating that it is a promising material for designing HTS magnets of the future.

The successful test of concept shows that the novel design, using a high-temperature superconductor, could help power tomorrow's particle accelerators, fusion machines and research magnets.

The compact coil could lead to a new generation of magnets for biomedical research, nuclear fusion reactors and many applications in between.

With funding from the National Science Foundation, scientists and engineers will determine the best way to build a new class of record-breaking instruments.

MagLab experts fine-tuned a furnace for pressure-cooking a novel superconducting magnet. Now they're about to build its big brother.

"GAP" award will help further breakthrough treatment system for next-generation superconducting magnets.

Recent measurements of superconducting tapes in the MagLab's 45-tesla hybrid magnet shows that the power function dependence of current on magnetic field remains valid up to 45T in liquid helium, while for magnetic field in the plane of the tape conductor, almost no magnetic field dependence is observed. Thus design of ultra-high-field magnets capable of reaching 50T and higher is feasible using the latest high-critical current density REBCO tape.

Made with high-temperature superconductors, the National MagLab's newest instrument shatters a world record and opens new frontiers in science.

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