A new non-Brownian model of anomalous translational diffusion in nervous tissue is introduced and applied to the brain. This model provides new fractional order parameters of diffusion, entropy, waiting time and jump length that represent unique markers of morphology in neural tissue.

Sodium MRI techniques point to better cancer treatments.

This instrument is located at the MagLab's AMRIS Facility at the University of Florida in Gainesville.

At 21.1 tesla, this is the strongest MRI scanner in the world for small animals. It is located in the MagLab's Tallahassee headquarters.

The MagLab has state-of-the art facilities to conduct MRI/S, diffusion and in vivo studies at record-high magnetic fields.

In Tallahassee, we have vertical widebore magnets that are capable of performing MR microimaging for both in vivo, in vitro and materials applications. They are equipped with Bruker Avance spectrometers and widebore imaging gradients providing diameters up to 63 mm on the 21.1 T magnet.

In Gainesville, we have a 750 MHz (17.6 tesla) widebore (89-mm) system for microimaging and in vivo imaging and spectroscopy with a 600 MHz (14 tesla) standard bore (52-mm) system for microimaging. Both systems are Bruker Avance consoles. There are two horizontal scanners (4.7 T/33 cm and 11.1 T/40 cm) dedicated for animal imaging, and a 3 tesla human scanner for translational studies.

External users can utilize animal facilities and technicians at both locations.

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Using the lab’s 21 tesla magnet to image chlorine in the brain, researchers explore new ways to track tumor growth.

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of solid materials entails numerous problems from short longitudinal relaxation (T2) times to requiring strong gradients to attain high resolution images. A promising technique to address these issues is the Stray Field Imaging (STRAFI) method.

Biomedical researchers have a unique tool to investigate a variety of living and excised specimen with the MagLab’s 21.1 T 900-MHz ultra-widebore (105-mm) vertical magnet. However, there are challenges to performing research in a high-field vertical magnet, which have been addressed by a NHMFL-led team of international scientists working to make very high field or ultra high field MRI more flexible. This team has constructed a tunable sliding ring transmit/receive volume coil for 900-MHz hydrogen MRI that provides the uniformity and sensitivity for high resolution and functional imaging of living samples while accommodating unique excised samples to improve characterization and throughput. This new design incorporates the apparatus necessary for maintaining animals in a vertical position while providing remote tuning and sample flexibility beyond most available coils.

When you have the most powerful MRI machine in the world, there's a lot of exciting research going on. Read about some of the cutting-edge studies we do on neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, tobacco use, muscles and more.

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