Volcanic activity, declining ocean oxygen triggered mass extinction of ancient marine organisms.

MagLab geochemist Jeremy Owens analyzed ancient fossils for the multi-institutional study published today in Nature.

A lot of the research conducted in powerful magnets ends up having a powerful effect on our day-to-day lives.

A geochemist gets down to earth about how life began on our planet.

Looking at environmental changes that occurred in ancient Earth, a research team finds new evidence of how the planet may handle excess carbon dioxide in the future.

Across disciplines, exciting stuff happens along the boundaries between things. What makes those realms so rich for research, and how do magnets shed light on them?

Studying dissolved organic matter helps us better understand our diverse and changing planet.

The high-tech tools empower scientists studying petroleum and other molecules to make decisions based on advanced data analysis.

Using an advanced technique, scientists discover that one of the most common substances in our everyday lives — glass — is more complex than we thought.

This week at the lab, Patricia Medeiros is fishing for answers using one of the lab’s ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) magnets.

Medeiros (pictured above, standing at right, with her grad students), an assistant professor of marine organic geochemistry at the University of Georgia (UGA), arrived Monday morning with one colleague, two graduate students, dozens of water samples from estuaries around Georgia’s Sapelo Island, and lots of questions. The team will spend the week analyzing the molecular composition of the dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the water, using the ICR Facility’s 9.4 tesla passively shielded magnet.

In collaboration with UGA microbiologist Mary Ann Moran, Medeiros is studying what different communities of bacteria are doing with this DOM. They are particularly interested in how bacteria chemically transform carbon from the ocean, a key step in the marine carbon cycle that is still not well understood.

That knowledge could help us understand and better prepare for future changes in the climate, said Medeiros. "We don’t know too much about how microbes interact with DOM. We do know that DOM plays an important role in the global carbon cycle, however."


By Kristen Coyne.

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