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When electricity became available to the masses, utilities needed meters to record customer usage. This early 20th century model resembles many in use today.

Though simple by today's standards, the early electrostatic generators were a great milestone in humankind's understanding of electricity, allowing scientists to produce electricity so they could study it.

Out of a humble ice pail the great experimentalist Michael Faraday created a device to demonstrate key principles of attraction, repulsion and electrostatic induction.

Just a year after electromagnetism was discovered, the great scientific thinker Michael Faraday figured out how to turn it into motion.

Léon Foucault, a French physicist much better known for his pendulum demonstrating the rotation of the Earth, also created in 1855 a device that illustrated how eddy currents work.

This tutorial illustrates how a galvanometer, an instrument that detects and measures small amounts of current in an electrical circuit, works.

The legendary Lord Kelvin made electricity from water with this ingenious electrostatic generator.

Sir Oliver Lodge's experiment demonstrating the first tunable radio receiver was an important stepping stone on the path toward the invention of a practical radio.

Magnetic core memory was developed in the late 1940s and 1950s, and remained the primary way in which early computers read, wrote and stored data until RAM came along in the 1970s.

Invented by William Thomson (who later became Lord Kelvin for such clever acts as this), the mirror galvanometer was a useful instrument that played a key role in the history of the telegraph.

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Magnet Academy is a free resource on magnetism & electricity brought to you by the Center for Integrating Research + Learning at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory.