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Zenobe Theophile Gramme (1826 – 1901) invented the first industrial generator, or dynamo. A deceptively simple-looking machine, it consisted of 30 coils wrapped around a spinning ring of iron.

The first hydroelectric power plant, known as the Vulcan Street Plant, was powered by the Fox River in Appleton, Wisconsin.

American inventor Vladimir Zworykin, the “father of television," conceived two components key to that invention: the iconoscope and the kinescope.

Found in more homes than any other appliance, the kettle has steadily evolved from an ancient tool to an important modern convenience.

With only minor changes to its original 1866 design, the Leclanché cell evolved into modern alkaline batteries and the most popular household battery to date.

Because they could store significant amounts of charge, Leyden jars allowed scientists to experiment with electricity in a way never before possible.

The history of electricity and magnetism starts with this special mineral possessing amazing, and still mysterious, properties.

The railroad industry began in the frontier days, magnetic levitation has moved it squarely into the space age.

At the dawn of the computer age, magnetic core memory helped make data storage possible, and showed surprising staying power in a field where components are constantly being replaced by new and improved products.

The magneto helped fire up the first generation of automobiles.

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Magnet Academy is a free resource on magnetism & electricity brought to you by the Center for Integrating Research + Learning at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory.