This finding sheds light on the role of quasiparticle mass enhancement near a quantum critical point in one of the leading families of high-temperature superconductors.

A lot of the research conducted in powerful magnets ends up having a powerful effect on our day-to-day lives.

Looking for ways to make better superconductors for the next-generation particle accelerators, a young scientist homed in on how they were heat-treated. He was getting warmer.

The finding in fullerides opens a new way of exploring the role electron interactions play in high-temperature superconductivity

At the National MagLab and other labs across the globe, the race to discover ever-warmer superconductors is heating up. Find out what these materials are, what they’re good for and why this field is red hot.

Pack a sack lunch and load up! We're hitting the road to learn how this massive magnet tracks sodium moving through your brain.

Hop on this information train for a step-by-step look at how one physicist uses magnets to understand superconductors, spin liquids and why some materials get frustrated.

Scientists discovered how strong of a magnetic field was necessary to suppress superconductivity in a thin film of iron-selenium.

No insulation? No problem! In fact, by challenging the conventions of magnet making, MagLab engineers created a first-of-its-kind magnet that has only just begun to make records.

Niobium diselenide is found to retain its superconductivity even under very high magnetic fields.

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