Lab Leadership

Alan Marshall

Chief Scientist for Ion Cyclotron Resonance

Following his B.A. at Northwestern University (1965) and Ph.D. at Stanford University (1970), Alan Marshall spent 11 years at the University British Columbia and 13 years at Ohio State University. In 1993 he moved to Florida State University.

He co-invented and leads the continuing development of Fourier transform ICR mass spectrometry. His current research includes FT-ICR instrumentation development, complex mixture analysis (e.g., petroleum and its products), and mapping primary and higher-order structures of proteins.

He has published five books, seven patents and 620 refereed journal articles (more than 31,500 I.S.I. citations), and has presented more than 2,000 seminars/posters.

His recognitions include: fellow, American Academy of Arts & Sciences, American Physical Society, American Chemical Society, American Association for the Advancement of Science, Society for Applied Spectroscopy, and National Academy of Inventors; three American Chemical Society national awards; American Society for Mass Spectrometry Distinguished Contribution Award; and International Society for Mass Spectrometry Thomson Medal.

See publications.

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Photo credit: Stephen Bilenky

Chris Hendrickson

ICR Facility Director

Hendrickson received a bachelor's degree in chemistry in 1990 from the University of Northern Iowa. He received his Ph.D. in analytical chemistry in 1995 from The University of Texas at Austin under the direction of Prof. David A. Laude, Jr. Hendrickson then spent one year as a postdoctoral fellow at the National MagLab with Prof. Alan G. Marshall. In 1996 Hendrickson joined the MagLab staff and is currently director of the lab's Ion Cyclotron Resonance Facility, as well as a Distinguished University Scholar at Florida State University.

See publications.

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Photo credit: Stephen Bilenky

David Larbalestier

Chief Materials Scientist

In addition to his role as chief materials scientist, David Larbalestier is the Francis Eppes Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering.

Larbalestier has been active in superconductivity ever since his Ph.D., when his thesis work gained the Matthey Prize of Imperial College London. At the Superconducting Magnet Research Group of the Rutherford Laboratory, he worked for four years on the development of multifilamentary Nb3Sn conductors and magnets. This work culminated in the first filamentary Nb3Sn magnets, one outcome of which was the first filamentary Nb3Sn NMR magnet (470 MHz), for which he shared a 1978 IR-100 award with an Oxford Instrument Company team.

In 1976 Larbalestier joined the University of Wisconsin in Madison, where he taught in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering and the Department of Physics, and held both the L. V. Shubnikov Chair and the David Grainger Chair of Superconductivity. His group has had a large influence on the understanding and application of both low- and high-temperature superconductors, and made the definitive studies of the materials science and processing of the most widely used superconductor, niobium titanium.

Larbalestier has been active in promoting collaborations uniting industry, national laboratory and other university groups. His leadership in both the low-temperature and high-temperature materials superconductor communities has led to prizes from the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and the Council for Chemical Research for his work and that of his collaborators on (Bi,Pb)2Sr2Ca2Cu3O10-x.

He has served on many review panels of the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Department of Energy (DOE), was a member of the 1987 National Academy of Sciences Panel on High Temperature Superconductivity, and led the 1996 World Technology Evaluation Center Panel on Energy Applications of Superconductors sponsored by DOE and NSF.

In 2000 he was a visiting professor at the University of Geneva and a visiting fellow at Imperial College London. In 2007 he was given the Lifetime Achievement Award of the International Cryogenic Materials Conference, and in 2009-2010 was the Distinguished Lecturer of the IEEE Council on Superconductivity. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society, the National Academy of Engineering, the Institute of Physics (UK), the National Academy of Inventors, the IEEE, the Materials Research Society and the AAAS.

Larbalestier is presently a member of U.S. Department of Energy’s High Energy Physics Advisory Panel and the National Materials and Manufacturing Board of the National Research Council. His work has been supported by several arms of the DOE, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, the National Science Foundation, ITER, CERN and numerous U.S. national laboratories. His 450 publications have received more than 14,000 citations.

See publications.

Email: David Larbalestier

Photo credit: Stephen Bilenky

Eric Palm

Deputy Lab Director

Eric Palm received his master's degree and Ph.D. in physics from Texas A&M University, where he won the Squire Fellowship. His thesis involved studying quantum interference effects in unique semiconductor devices at low temperatures in strong magnetic fields. He had previously received a B.A. in physics from Rice University and taught physics at a high school in Houston. After completing his Ph.D., Palm received a National Research Council Postdoctoral Fellowship to study the quantum Hall effect at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. When the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory opened its doors in Tallahassee in 1993, Palm was one of the first scientists hired in the DC Field Facility. He served as the Millikelvin Facility chief in charge of creating experimental apparatus capable of cooling a sample to less than 20 thousandths of a degree above absolute zero while in the highest magnetic fields in the world. In 2007 Palm became director of the DC Field Facility, the largest of the facilities at the MagLab. In 2012 he was named deputy laboratory director of the MagLab working in partnership with the director to ensure that the lab is performing at the highest level possible. Palm has over 50 publications and his research interests include unconventional superconductivity and highly correlated electronic systems.

See publications.

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Photo credit: Dave Barfield

Gregory Boebinger

MagLab Director

Boebinger received bachelor’s degrees in physics, electrical engineering and philosophy in 1981 from Purdue University. With a Churchill Scholarship, he traveled to the University of Cambridge for one year of research under Professor Sir Richard Friend, studying one-dimensional organic superconductors. He received his Ph.D. in physics in 1986 from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he held Compton and Hertz Foundation Fellowships. His thesis research utilized high magnetic fields and ultra-low temperatures to study the fractional quantum Hall effect with Nobel Laureates Horst Stormer and Dan Tsui.

Boebinger then spent a year as a NATO Postdoctoral Fellow in Paris at the École Normale Supérieure. In 1987, he joined Bell Laboratories, where he studied correlated electron systems, including high-temperature superconductors, using pulsed magnetic fields. In 1998, he moved to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to head the National MagLab’s Pulsed Field Facility.

In 2004, Boebinger moved to Florida State University (FSU) to become director of the MagLab, with responsibility for all three campuses: FSU, LANL and the University of Florida (UF). Boebinger is also a professor of physics at FSU and UF.

Greg Boebinger is a Fellow of the American Physical Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

See publications.

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Photo credit: Dave Barfield

Joanna Long

Associate Lab Director University of Florida Branch and Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy Facility Director

Long was an inaugural member of the Sturgis Fellows at the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, and received her bachelor’s degree in chemistry with minors in math, French, and microbiology in 1990. She received her Ph.D. in physical chemistry in 1997 from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where she held an NSF Pre-Doctoral Fellowship. Her thesis research, under the direction of Robert Griffin, utilized solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy at high magnetic fields to study the interplay between structure and dynamics in biological systems.

Long then spent three years as a postdoctoral researcher in the department of bioengineering at the University of Washington using NMR spectroscopy to study biomineralization. In 2000, she accepted a staff scientist position in the department of chemistry at the University of Washington, developing and supporting high-field NMR experiments. In 2002, she was recruited to the University of Florida (UF) to head her own research group.

In 2009, Long became director of the MagLab's AMRIS Facility, with primary responsibility for its science and technology portfolio in high-field MRI and NMR spectroscopy. Long is also a professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at UF, where her research group uses NMR spectroscopy to study the molecular underpinnings of biofilm formation, pulmonary surfactant properties, and dynamic nuclear polarization.

See publications.

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Photo credit: Stephen Bilenky

Lance Cooley

ASC Director

Lance Cooley is a professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Florida State University, in addition to his MagLab roles as director of the Applied Superconductivity Center (ASC) and an associate lab director.

Cooley began his career in superconducting materials in 1986 at the University of Wisconsin – Madison, in the Applied Superconductivity Center under the direction of Prof. David Larbalestier. Lance’s early career, starting with his Ph.D. thesis, explored the ultimate limits of electric current in superconducting wires used for magnets. His thesis was awarded the Materials Research Society Graduate Award for the construction of periodic arrangements of flux-pinning centers at nanometer scale in superconducting wires. He earned a National Research Council Postdoctoral Fellowship at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Boulder, Colorado, and later returned to Madison, Wisconsin, as a member of the research faculty to further investigate limits of superconductors.

The discovery of superconductivity in magnesium diboride in 2001 prompted Cooley to move to Brookhaven National Laboratory, where he eventually became head of the Superconducting Materials Group. He moved to Fermilab in 2007 to lead the SRF Materials Group, and later the Superconducting Materials Department. During this time, he coordinated external programs at multiple universities, laboratories and industry to improve performance of superconducting radio-frequency cavities and superconducting wires. This led to specifications and international standards related to niobium commerce, for which he received the International Electrotechnical Commission 1906 Award. He joined Florida State University and MagLab in 2017. He is also the manager of conductor acquisition for the Large Hadron Collider High-Luminosity Accelerator Upgrade Project as well as the head of Conductor Procurement and R&D for the National Magnet Development Program, both in the U.S. Department of Energy Office of High-Energy Physics.

Cooley serves as vice-president for publications for the IEEE Council on Superconductivity, which publishes the IEEE Transactions on Applied Superconductivity. He has served on many review panels of the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation. He is a fellow of the Institute of Physics and a senior member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE). He has over 120 refereed publications, and has given more than 30 colloquia, plenary or public lectures.

See publications.

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Photo credit: Stephen Bilenky

Laura Greene

Chief Scientist

In addition to her role as chief scientist at the National MagLab, Greene is the Francis Eppes Professor of Physics at Florida State University and the associate director of the Center for Emergent Superconductivity. Her research is on quantum materials, focusing on fundamental studies to determine the mechanisms of unconventional superconductivity by planar tunneling and point contact electron spectroscopies and developing methods for predictive design of new families of superconducting materials.

Greene plays an active leadership role in numerous science organizations. In 2017, as president of the American Physical Society (APS), her presidential theme was science diplomacy on national and international scales and its application to human rights. She currently co-chairs the Decadal Survey for Materials Research for the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) and serves on the Board of Directors for the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She is a vice president of the Executive Council of the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics, and chairs the organization’s Commission on the Structure and Dynamic of Condensed Matter Physics (C10) and its U.S. International Liaison Committee.

A champion for diversity and equal rights for women and minorities, Greene is a member of the U.S. Department of State-supported COACh team, which promotes the success and impact of women and all young scientists, particularly in developing countries.

Greene is a member of the NAS, a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Institute of Physics (U.K.), and the APS. She has been a Guggenheim Fellow and garnered numerous awards, including the E.O. Lawrence Award for Materials Research from the U.S. Department of Energy, the APS Maria Goeppert-Mayer Award, and the Bellcore Award of Excellence. She has co-authored over 200 publications and presented over 500 invited talks.

See publications.

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Photo credit: Dave Barfield

Lucio Frydman

Chief Scientist in Chemistry and Biology

Frydman studied at the University of Buenos Aires in Argentina, where he earned a bachelor’s of science in chemistry (1986) as well as a Ph.D. in physical chemistry (1990).

In addition to his work as the MagLab’s chief scientist in chemistry and biology, Frydman serves as professor and head at the Department of Chemical and Biological Physics at the Weizmann Institute of Sciences.

Frydman has earned numerous science accolades over the course of his career. These include: Tianjuan Wang Lecturer, Chinese Academy of Sciences (2014), Russell Varian Prize (2013), Sir Paul T. Callaghan Lecturer, ISMAR (2013), Outstanding Immigrant Scientist, State of Israel (2010), Advanced Grant Awardee, European Research Council (2010), Honorary Member, NMR Society of India (2010), Kimmel Award, Weizmann Institute (2009), Fellow, International Society of Magnetic Resonance (2008), Vaughan Lecturer, Rocky Mountains Conference (2006), Arthur D. Little Lecturer, MIT (2006), Sir Peter Mansfield Senior Visiting Fellow, University of Nottingham (2005), Israel Chemical Society Young Investigator Award (2005), Chemistry Awardee, Weizmann Institute Scientific Council (2004), Laukien Prize (2000), Alfred P. Sloan Fellow (1997), University of Illinois Scholar (1996), Beckman Young Investigator (1996), Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar (1996), CAREER Awardee, US NSF (1995), Camille and Henry Dreyfus New Faculty Awardee (1992) and Graduate Research Fellow, National Research Council of Argentina (1986).

In addition to science, Frydman’s interests include history, as well as hiking, running or biking in the company of family and friends.

See publications.

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Photo credit: Stephen Bilenky

Mark Bird

Director of Magnet Science and Technology

Bird received his bachelor’s degree with high honors in mechanics in 1988 from Michigan State University, after spending part of his junior year at the Rheinische-Westphaelische Technische Hochschule in Aachen, Germany, studying boundary integral methods in solid mechanics with Prof. Dr. Ulrich Heisse. He received his M.S. and Ph.D. in mechanical engineering in 1989 and 1992, respectively, from Stanford University where he held a National Science Foundation graduate research fellowship. His thesis research was analytic work on the interaction of circular inhomogeneities in harmonic and biharmonic problems with Charles Steele.

Bird then joined the National MagLab as head of the resistive magnet program and led the development of the Florida-Bitter magnet technology and numerous world-record resistive magnets at the MagLab as well as a few magnets in Europe and Asia. By 2000 he was also leading magnet development projects using superconducting and pulsed field technology.

In 2006 Bird became director of the MagLab’s Magnet Science and Technology division and the principal investigator on resistive/superconducting hybrid magnet projects, which produced the highest fields worldwide for neutron scattering (Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin) and for condensed matter nuclear magnetic resonance (the MagLab's 36-tesla Series Connected Hybrid).

See publications.

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Photo credit: Stephen Bilenky

Neil Sullivan

High B/T Facility Director

Sullivan holds undergraduate degrees from Otago University in New Zealand and received his Ph.D. at Harvard University in 1972, working on NMR studies at low temperatures with Robert Pound. He and his students in Paris discovered the quadrupolar glass phase of solid hydrogen and have studied the dynamics of vacancies and impurities in quantum solids, both helium and hydrogen.

A Fellow of the American Physical Society, and member of the Société Française de Physique, he was awarded the Prix Saintour by the Collège de France in 1978, and the La Caze Physics Prize by the Académie des Sciences (Paris) in 1983. He was a founding co-principal investigator for the National MagLab and a member of the Board of Governors of the Joint Oceanographic Institutions in 1999. He chaired the Physics Department at the University of Florida (UF) from 1989 to 1999, and under his watch the new physics building was planned and completed. He also served as Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences from 2000 to 2006, during which time he oversaw the creation of the Graham Center for Public Service, the Center for European Studies, the Paris Research Center, the Center for the Humanities, and initiated programs for new degrees in biology, women’s studies and gender research, and nine new languages at UF. He also oversaw the development of a UF partnership with Spain for the assembly and operation of the 10-meter telescope on the Canary Islands. Sullivan is currently Professor of Physics at UF.

Sullivan has authored more than 280 referred publications in his field, and was one of the founders of UF’s Microkelvin Laboratory in 1986 (with Dwight Adams and Gary Ihas). He is currently the editor of the Journal of Low Temperature Physics.

See publications.

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Photo credit: Department of Physics, University of Florida

Scott Hannahs

Director for Scientific Instrumentation and Operations

Since 1993, Scott Hannahs has played an instrumental role in developing the DC Field user program at the National MagLab. Prior to that he spent four years at the Francis Bitter National Magnet Lab at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Since receiving his Ph.D. at UCLA in ultra-low temperature superfluid acoustics, Hannahs has conducted research in most high magnetic field research areas, including organic superconductivity, high-temperature superconductivity, 2D electron gas systems, heavy fermions, correlated electron systems and geometrically frustrated spin systems.

Hannahs' expertise in cryogenics and instrumentation development at the MagLab has led to several collaborations with industry and an R&D 100 award. He has developed ultra-sensitive instrumentation for measurements at extremes of pressure, temperature and magnetic fields. A Florida State University Distinguished University Scholar, Hannahs is also a fellow of the American Physical Society, has published over 100 peer-reviewed papers and has served on several national and international facilities review committees.

See publications.

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Photo credit: Stephen Bilenky

Stephen Hill

EMR Facility Director

Stephen Hill received his B.A. and D. Phil. degrees in physics from the University of Oxford in 1991 and 1994, respectively. From 1995 to 1997, he held a postdoctoral position at the National MagLab. He then took up faculty positions at Montana State University and the University of Florida before moving to Florida State University in 2008, where he is a professor of physics. Hill has more than 20 years of experience performing microwave and far-infrared magneto-optical spectroscopy in high magnetic fields, using a wide array of measurement techniques. His work has involved significant technique development. Current research interests include: fundamental studies of quantum phenomena in molecular magnets and correlated electron systems (quantum magnets and superconductors); and structure property relationships in a wide variety of polynuclear transition metal complexes.

See publications.

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Photo credit: Stephen Bilenky

Tim Cross

NMR Facility Director

In 1976 Cross received a B.S. degree from Trinity College in Hartford, Conn., and later a Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of Pennsylvania with Prof. Stanley J. Opella pursuing technological development for structural and dynamic characterizations of protein through solid state NMR spectroscopy. Cross spent 1983 at the University of Basel’s Biozentrum in Switzerland with Prof. Joachim Seelig. While Cross’s NATO fellowship was to pursue this lipid research with Seelig, he spent much of the year developing MRI probes for one of the first MRI instruments for human extremities and laboratory animals.

In 1984 at Florida State University’s Department of Chemistry, Cross pursued the use of solid state NMR of transmembrane peptides and proteins. Having received a Presidential Young Investigator Award from NSF, he characterized the structure of gramicidin A in a liquid crystalline lipid environment, the first all-atom structure of a membrane peptide or protein in a lipid environment. Along the way he became an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow and in 1989. Cross was recruited by Prof. Jack Crow to write portions of the successful grant proposal to the National Science Foundation for moving the National MagLab from MIT to Tallahassee.

Cross is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and of the Biophysical Society as well as the International Society for Magnetic Resonance.

See publications.

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Photo credit: Stephen Bilenky

Tim Murphy

DC Field Facility Director

Murphy received his B.S. in physics in 1990 from Loras College and his M.S. in physics in 1993 from North Carolina State University. At NC State he studied under Prof. David Haase using ultra-low temperatures and magnetic fields to produce brute-force polarization of hydrogen nuclei for neutron scattering experiments at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory. His master’s thesis project was the design, construction and testing of a dilution refrigerator intended as a platform for bolometers used to detect cosmic rays.

Murphy came to the National MagLab in 1994 as a user support scientist in the Instrumentation & Operations Group, where he worked on developing ultra-low temperature instrumentation and sample environments for measurements in high magnetic fields. At the MagLab he switched from nuclear physics to the study of correlated electron materials in high fields. Murphy was named Millikelvin Facility Chief in 2008, interim DC Field Facility Director in 2012 and DC Field Facility Director in 2014.

See publications.

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Photo credit: Stephen Bilenky