With just a drop of water, a cobalt-based material changes both color and magnetic properties.

Using high-field electromagnets, scientists explore a promising alternative to the increasingly expensive rare earth element widely used in motors.

New technique transforms common materials into powerful magnets.

From nanorockets to nanocages, good science can come in tiny packages — all with the aim of solving really big problems.

A lot of the research conducted in powerful magnets ends up having a powerful effect on our day-to-day lives.

In the field of inorganic chemistry, magneto-structural correlations have been used to rationally design molecules with desirable properties, and to relate these properties to the electronic and geometric structures. In turn, such studies provide powerful tools for understanding important catalytic processes, as well as elucidating the structures of active sites in metalloproteins. This study reveals an unusually strong sensitivity of the magnetic properties of a CoS4 molecule to minute changes in its structure.

Scientists discovered how to tune the optical properties of atomically-thin semiconductors, which will aid the design of future microscopic light sensors.

This approach to building “qubits” could be a promising tool for developing quantum computers.

Tapping into MagLab expertise on superconductors and cryogenics, a research team built a novel neutron scattering device that is more efficient and produces better data than previous techniques.

Scientists created a molecular nanomagnet based on a single nickel atom with record-high magnetic anisotropy — a quality that makes it a promising building block for applications like memory storage.

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