The Series Connected Hybrid magnet that is under fabrication at the NHMFL will utilize current leads containing high temperature superconductor to deliver 20 kA with low heat loads to the helium circuit. The leads have been successfully tested and are ready for installation into the magnet system.

The seven-year collaboration with the Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin resulted in a 26 T magnet for neutron scattering. This magnet is very similar to the FSU/NSF series-connected hybrid magnet and suggests that the FSU magnet will also be successful, thereby enabling new science on two continents with two very different sets of experimental techniques.

Scientists have discovered a way to significantly improve the performance of a decades-old superconductor, promising future applications for particle accelerators and research magnets.

Ten years ago the 900 Ultra-Wide Bore magnet became available to an international user community for Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and Magnetic Resonance Imaging at the National High Magnetic Field Lab. Since then 69 publications have been published from this instrument spanning many disciplines and the number of publications per year continues to increase with 26 in just the past 18 months demonstrating that state of the art data continues to be collected on this superb magnet.

This high-tech spool is one big bobbin.

Reduced-size prototype coils for the 32 T all-superconducting magnet have been successfully tested. The results include the generation of 27 T, which is a record for superconducting magnets.

To get millions of watts of electricity into our magnets, we need a couple of these.

This week at the lab, we're preparing a home for a new magnet that will give more scientists access to some of the highest magnetic fields in the world.

The new Duplex Magnet, slated for completion this fall at the Pulsed Field Facility in Los Alamos, New Mexico, will reach fields up to 80 teslas, although it will most often run at 75 teslas to extend its lifetime. Like the other instruments available at the Pulsed Field Facility, the Duplex will generate these incredibly high fields for just a fraction of a second — still ample time for physicists to get valuable data.

But unlike the facility’s other magnets, the Duplex features two coils that will be powered by separate circuits and capacitors. This design helps operators better manage the temperature and stress the instrument is subjected to and allows for flexibility in future improvements.

The Duplex will be located near the facility’s primary workhorse, the 65 Tesla Multi-Shot Magnet. Featuring the same 15-millimeter bore for inserting experiments, it will enable more scientists to do cutting-edge experiments in these extreme fields.


Photo by Stephen Bilenky. Text by Kristen Coyne.

Two scientists put their heads together and created a machine that speeds along magnet production.

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