The MagLab is playing a key role in the design and construction of a new 45 tesla hybrid magnet to be located at the High Field Magnet Lab at Radboud University in Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

The lab’s flagship magnet, the 45 tesla hybrid is composed of a 33.5 tesla resistive magnet nested in an 11.5 tesla outsert.

Scientists using MagLab magnets bolster theory that quantum fluctuations drive strange electronic phenomena.

Using the high magnetic fields available at the NHMFL, users from MIT were able to observe a quantum spin hall (QSH) state in graphene. The QSH state results in two oppositely oriented spin currents flowing clockwise and counter clockwise around the edge of the graphene flake without dissipation effects. This discovery further advances the exciting work being done to bring about spin based electronics.

Using the 45 tesla hybrid magnet, researchers at the MagLab observed the long-predicted but never-before-seen fractal known as the Hofstadter butterfly. This work enriches our understanding of the basic physics of electrons in a magnetic field and opens a new route for exploring the role of topology in condensed matter systems.

Examining the material samarium hexaboride, scientists discover seemingly contradictory properties and an exciting, new mystery for physicists.

New kind of quantum Hall state observed in graphene superlattices.

Scientists working at the MagLab have made a breakthrough in identifying the state from which high-Tc superconductivity emerges. Their results are in the June 19th issue of the journal Nature.

Thanks to conditions created by the MagLab’s 45 tesla hybrid magnet, scientists have made a technological breakthrough on graphene: When they placed it on top of hexagonal boron nitride, graphene became a semiconductor.

Nicolas Doiron-Leyraud of Canada's Université de Sherbrooke talks about his recent experiments on cuprate superconductors, why he chose physics over philosophy, and what makes the MagLab a great place to do science.

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