23 March 2020

Analytical tool for in vivo triple quantum MR signals

The computer based analytical tool is illustrated by visualization of the TQ MR signals inside the traditional TQ RF pulse sequence used to detect bound ions. The computer based analytical tool is illustrated by visualization of the TQ MR signals inside the traditional TQ RF pulse sequence used to detect bound ions.

Magnetic resonance (MR) signals of sodium and potassium nuclei during ion binding are attracting increased attention as a potential biomarker of in vivo cell energy metabolism. This new analytical tool helps describe and visualize the results of MR experiments in the presence of in vivo ion binding.

What did scientists discover?

The effect of ion binding was described precisely using quantum mechanics and the power of "Mathematica" software (Wolfram Inc.). The analytical computer based tool, including corresponding software, was created to represent MR signals appearing during in vivo binding. The results are illustrated for common in vivo ions as sodium and potassium.

Why is this important?

The results of a variety of MR experiments can be predicted and described exactly for any combination of the RF pulses. A concise mathematical presentation of MR signals - including the complex signals from bound positively-charged ions, such as sodium and potassium - fosters efficient guidance for the development of diverse in vivo applications. The triple quantum signals have a special value by representing explicitly only bound ions, and because of this provide valuable intact physiological information about cell functioning both in vivo and in bioreactors. For example, in vivo changes of intracellular sodium can be measured during drug administration or diseases. The novel in vivo MR signal applications developed to date are encouraging, attracting strong interest among MagLab users and other scientists.

Who did the research?

Victor D. Schepkin

National MagLab/Florida State University

Why did they need the MagLab?

The ultra-high magnetic fields dramatically increase MR sensitivity allowing for the detection of novel MR signals from sodium and potassium. The MagLab provides expertise and an exceptional facility to conduct such research.

Details for scientists

Funding

This research was funded by the following grants: G.S. Boebinger (NSF DMR-1157490, NSF DMR-1644779)


For more information, contact Victor Schepkin.

Details

  • Research Area: Biology,Magnet Resonance Technique Development, Quantum Fluids and Solids
  • Research Initiatives: Life
  • Facility / Program: NMR/MRI
  • Year: 2020
Last modified on 23 March 2020