23 March 2020

MRI detects brain responses to Alzheimer's disease plaque deposits and inflammation

Resting state functional MRI at 11.1T revealed the effects on brain microstructures and intrinsic activity due to β-amyloid (Aβ) plaque deposits and inflammation, as indicated by the presence of the inflammatory protein interleukin-6 (IL6). Resting state functional MRI at 11.1T revealed the effects on brain microstructures and intrinsic activity due to β-amyloid (Aβ) plaque deposits and inflammation, as indicated by the presence of the inflammatory protein interleukin-6 (IL6).

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of mouse models for Alzheimer’s disease can be used to determine brain response to plaque deposits and inflammation that ultimately disrupt emotion, learning, and memory. Quantification of the early changes with high resolution MRI could help monitor and predict disease progression, as well as potentially suggest new treatment methods.

What did the scientists discover?

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can be used to measure changes in brain microstructures of mice affected by Alzheimer's disease, an inflammatory brain disease with effects that disrupt the limbic functions of emotion, learning, and memory.

THE TOOLS THEY USED

This research was conducted in the 11.1 T MRI system at the MagLab's AMRIS Facility located at the University of Florida.

Why is this important?

Alzheimer's disease is a neurodegenerative condition linked to plaque deposits in the brain. The study of mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease can be used to determine the roles of extracellular β-amyloid (Aβ) plaque deposits and inflammation in affecting brain morphology and function. Quantifying changes in the brain using MRI will help to monitor and predict disease progression, as well as potentially suggest new treatment methods.

Who did the research?

L. Colon-Perez1,4, K. R. Ibanez2,5, M. Suarez4, K. Torroella4, K. Acuna4, E. Ofori1,6, Y. Levites1,2,5,7, D. E. Vaillancourt1,3,4,6, T. E. Golde1,2,5,7, P. Chakrabarty1,2,5,7, M. Febo1,3,4,7

1Florida Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, 2Center for Translational Research on Neurodegenerative Diseases, U. Florida; 3AMRIS Facility, 4Psychiatry, 5Neuroscience, 6Applied Physiology & Kinesiology, 7McKnight Brain Institute

Why did they need the MagLab?

Specialty MRI coils created for the unique 11.1T MRI magnet system at the MagLab's AMRIS Facility, in conjunction with the strong MRI technique experience of the AMRIS staff, enabled the acquisition of high-resolution images of mouse brains. The diffusion MRI and functional connectivity analyses were carried out at 11.1T in mice with early onset deposit of amyloid plaque in the brain.

Details for scientists

Funding

This research was funded by the following grants: NIH P50AG047266, R01NS052318, R01NS075012, T32NS082168, P50NS091856, 1R01AG055798; G.S. Boebinger (NSF DMR-1157490, NSF DMR-1644779)


For more information, contact Joanna Long.

Details

  • Research Area: Biology
  • Research Initiatives: Life
  • Facility / Program: AMRIS
  • Year: 2020
Last modified on 23 March 2020