15 May 2012

First Superfluorescence in a Solid

Superfluorescence, historically, is the spontaneous emission of light from a collection of excited atoms. Scientists visiting the MagLab recently discovered superfluorescence for the first time in a solid material, by shining an extremely brief pulse of light on a layered semiconductor located in an intense magnetic field. In response, superfluorescent light of a different color was emitted thirty trillionths of a second later. Superfluorescence can be used to produce light of any desired color and could be enhanced to occur at room temperature and without magnetic fields. Superfluorescent devices would be powerful tools for optical communications.

For more information contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or David Reitze.

Details

  • Research Area: Other Condensed Matter
  • Research Initiatives: Materials
  • Facility / Program: DC Field
  • Year: 2012
Last modified on 17 April 2015