Studies of uranium ditelluride in high magnetic fields show superconductivity switching off at 35 T, but reoccurring at higher magnetic fields between 40 and 65 T.

In a uranium-based compound once dismissed as boring, scientists watched superconductivity arise, perish, then return to life under the influence of high magnetic fields.

And now for something completely different: 10 high-field physics predictions that Monty Python nailed.

What hides behind the elegantly simple line that describes the relationship between temperature and electrical resistance in certain materials? For some physicists, this is the most compelling question in the field.

In the Netherlands, researchers double down on new discoveries by boosting the power of high-field magnets with lasers.

When physicists studied a superconducting material at very high fields, they were pleasantly amazed by what they saw.

In a hydrogen-packed compound squeezed to ultra-high pressures, scientists have observed electrical current with zero resistance tantalizingly close to room temperature.

The observation of topological states coupled with superconductivity represents an opportunity for scientists to manipulate nontrivial superconducting states via the spin-orbit interaction. While superconductivity has been extensively studied since its discovery in 1910, the advent of topological materials gives scientists a new avenue to explore quantum matter. BiPd is being studied using "MagLab-sized fields" by scientists from LSU in an effort to determine if it is indeed a topological superconductor.

To increase the rate of particle collisions in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, new powerful magnets will soon be made from Nb3Sn superconducting wires. Here, researchers report a change to the heat-treatment temperature to optimize Nb3Sn superconducting magnet performance.

Scientists probing the exotic, 2D realm are discovering astonishing behaviors that could revolutionize our 3D world.

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