Researchers investigating a strange material show how it could advance the development of next-generation transistors for the superfast electronics of tomorrow.

High magnetic fields reveal the electronic interactions underlying high-temperature superconductivity in the iron pnictides. This research unifies the superconducting phase diagram of the pnictides with those of other quantum critical, high-temperature superconductors, such at the cuprates.

The MagLab is playing a key role in the design and construction of a new 45 tesla hybrid magnet to be located at the High Field Magnet Lab at Radboud University in Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

Comprehensive angle-resolved quantum oscillation measurements on YBa2Cu3O6+x in magnetic fields approaching 100 tesla are used to address longstanding problem of the normal state electronic of underdoped high temperature superconducting cuprates. The symmetry of the Fermi surface points uniquely to its reconstruction by biaxial ordering of the charge and bond degrees of freedom.

Scientists working at the MagLab have made a breakthrough in identifying the state from which high-Tc superconductivity emerges. Their results are in the June 19th issue of the journal Nature.

Using the high magnetic fields available at the NHMFL, users from MIT were able to observe a quantum spin hall (QSH) state in graphene. The QSH state results in two oppositely oriented spin currents flowing clockwise and counter clockwise around the edge of the graphene flake without dissipation effects. This discovery further advances the exciting work being done to bring about spin based electronics.

The lab’s flagship magnet, the 45 tesla hybrid is composed of a 33.5 tesla resistive magnet nested in an 11.5 tesla outsert.

Using the 45T hybrid magnet, researchers uncover the quantum Hall effect in hydrogenated graphene.

This magnet combines a superconducting magnet of 11.5 tesla with a resistive magnet of 33.5 tesla.

Using the 45 tesla hybrid magnet, researchers at the MagLab observed the long-predicted but never-before-seen fractal known as the Hofstadter butterfly. This work enriches our understanding of the basic physics of electrons in a magnetic field and opens a new route for exploring the role of topology in condensed matter systems.

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